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Divers work on bow of USS Pittsburg (CA-72), June 1945

Divers work on bow of USS Pittsburg (CA-72), June 1945


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Divers work on bow of USS Pittsburg (CA-72), June 1945

Here we see divers working on the bow of the Baltimore class heavy cruiser USS Pittsburg (CA-72) at Guam in June 1945, after the original bow was pulled off the ship during a storm!


Douglas Duane Dietrich Exposed

Outline for Douglas Dietrich: "Points on The Curve" Interview

Douglas Duane Dietrich is known for his history of making outrageous claims which are unsubstantiated and easily proven to be false. Dietrich is not a credentialled historian, he is a revisionist with an entirely false persona.

Dietrich describes himself as being a "public informant", "Renegade Military Historian", "DoD Research Librarian", "US Marine", "Mercenary", "SF Police Officer", and the "Biological Son of Adolf Hitler".

Dietrich is a pathological liar, maybe Bi-polar and quite possibly a schizophrenic. Dietrich is a talented speaker but he is also the meanest, nastiest person I have ever investigated. He is manipulative of his closest followers and demands their absolute obedience and loyalty.

He will use defamation and slander in the sickest, most vicious manner possible when attacking anyone who exposes him or challenges his revisionist narrative of history. Anyone making a negative comment on a YouTube video is considered to be a "gang-stalker" and allied with a Satanic group of people who were being controlled by the late Michael Aquino.

The truth is that Dietrich's entire "personae" is an elaborate fiction which he has spent years creating and maintaining. It is one of the most elaborate deceptions I have ever encountered.

After exposing his false claims of Military Service in 2016, I have been attacked by Dietrich and his "cult" on a constant basis using defamation and slander, and at one point going as far as using a VA Employee to secretly obtain my Personal Identifying Info and publicly release it repeatedly using his internet radio and YouTube platforms in retaliation.

With the exception of researcher Steven Outtrim, I am the only person to investigate/research his claims and publish the results.

Dietrich has been largely rejected by the Ufology/Conspiracy and Exopolitics community for his lack of credibility and anti-American, anti-Veteran views.

Every public appearance and presentation by Douglas Dietrich since 2008 has been a feeble attempt to convince his audience that the Allies lost WW2 and the Axis won. His contempt and disdain for his audiences and angry method of delivery is evident in every presentation.

Slide shown at end of Dietrich's presentations

"The End"
"EMBRACE DEFEAT AND GO IN PEACE"

Timeline: The Origin of Douglas Dietrich and the truth about his father's military service.

1. George Joesph Dietrich: Oct 23, 1919 - March 26, 2007

George J. Dietrich served honorably from June 1941 to August 1965 and retired at the rank of Petty Officer 1st Class (E-6)

I requested and received releasable information from his father's records under the FOIA in 2017. Using this information I was able to piece together his WW2 service history. I have posted these findings, as well as a comparison with Dietrichs' claims on my blog where I specifically noted his being awarded the Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal - WWII Ribbon (2 Stars). https://rkcolejr.blogspot.com/2019/01/george-dietrich-ribbons.html

The award of the Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal - WWII Ribbon (2 Stars) indicates that he was in the Pacific Theater of Operations during at least two engagements or operations in which his unit (vessel) was involved.


1946–1948 Edit

Gypsy completed her shakedown training on 20 March 1946, and sailed 10 days later from Norfolk, VA for San Pedro, CA, where she arrived on 26 May. The ship then departed on 14 June to take part in the impending "Operation Crossroads", a historic series of atomic tests. Arriving off the atoll on 10 July 1946, Gypsy witnessed the "Baker" Test on 25 July and assisted in recovering beached and damaged craft and doing underwater work on test ships, as the US Navy developed a large amount of valuable scientific information on the effects of the atomic bomb on ships and how to reduce them.

Departing on 16 September 1946, Gypsy worked on the raising of SS Britain Victory at Honolulu, HI until 8 November. She arrived San Pedro on 10 December 1946 for extensive repairs until June 1947, then did limited salvage work before proceeding to Guam, arriving on 18 August 1947. There Gypsy salvaged and towed to Guam the former bow of cruiser Pittsburgh (CA-72) , lost in the great typhoon of June 1945. She returned to San Diego on 17 January 1948, decommissioned on 21 January and joined Pacific Reserve Fleet, San Diego Group.

1951–1955 Edit

Gypsy was recommissioned on 8 August 1951, and after shakedown and repairs arrived Pearl Harbor on 19 October 1951. For the next seven months the ship operated in Apra Harbor, Guam, relocating mooring buoys and working on the breakwater. Arriving Pearl Harbor on 31 May 1952, Gypsy had new salvage equipment and electronic gear installed and sailed on 15 September for Subic Bay. Arriving on 9 October she began removing a sunken Japanese hulk. She sailed on 9 January 1953 for Inchon, South Korea, site of one of the decisive amphibious operations in history. There Gypsy removed a sunken barge from the harbor. Later she worked off Pohang and helped clear explosives from Ulsan harbor. Korean coastal work was completed on 6 May 1953, and the ship sailed for Pearl Harbor, via Yokosuka and Midway Island, arriving on 5 June. After operations there, Gypsy sailed to Eniwetok and upon her arrival on 18 September began renewing and positioning fleet moorings for the coming atomic bomb tests, "Operation Castle". She arrived Bikini Atoll on 7 February 1954 and witnessed the first test shot, the second thermonuclear explosion in history, on 1 March 1954. She assisted in recovering test equipment, was detached on 26 March 1954, returned to Pearl Harbor on 18 April. After operations there, she sailed to Long Beach, CA, arriving on 4 May 1955 for deactivation. Gypsy decommissioned on 23 December 1955 at Astoria, OR, and was placed in reserve.

In 1967 she was again relocated to the Pacific Reserve Fleet, San Diego Group. Gypsy was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 1 June 1973 and sold for scrapping by the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) on 1 January 1974.


"1945 Michigan Train Crash Story" by David Spell

My name is David Spell and I was one of 6 sailors that were in the train wreck in Michigan, North Dakota. The story starts during the month of June 1945, all 6 of the sailors on the train were from North Carolina. I am writing you to explain the reason why I, along with 5 other sailors were on the train together when the wreck happened on the 9th of August, 1945.

The six sailors were originally aboard a heavy cruiser ship, the USS Pittsburgh (CA 72) in the North China Sea during the war. On June 4th, we were caught in a bad storm, (a typhoon). The water began to run onto the bow of the ship, causing much damage. Later that night, the wind began blowing in excess of 148 MPH and the ships bow began to break apart, eventually breaking off completely. As morning began, the weather let up some and we drifted out of danger and later in the day, the sea was calm again.

At that time, we were about 200 miles from Guam Islands. We made it to a dry dock near the islands and had some repair work done to the ship and started toward the coast of the state of Washington around the middle of July. We arrived in Bremerton, Washington at the naval yard. During the crossing, the Captain made arrangements for five of the crew to have 25 days of leave at home.

Once our leave time was over(around the 1st of August) crews began to return to their ship. Six sailors, including myself, boarded trains in Chicago, Illinois on the Great Northern. A large group of military people were on train #1 in Chicago. Train #2 left Chicago 20 minutes later. We six sailors were on train #1, sitting in a passenger car that was about 5 cars from the rear. Our train (#1 train) stopped in Michigan, North Dakota due to a hot box. At approximately 7:30PM, train #2 , which was 30 minutes behind our train came into Michigan, North Dakota. Train #2 hit the back of our train, hitting us at a speed of approximately 57 MPH. The five other sailors and myself were seated in the approximate middle of the train in the 5th car from the rear. Some of the sailors were standing and talking, some were not wearing shoes, but we were all relaxing as train #2 hit us from behind. People were thrown about the car, some received minor injuries including cuts and bruises. It was said that one passenger, a man, was killed in our car due to a broken neck.

A ship wreck and a train wreck are two events that you don't forget. It was a very serious accident with a lot of people hurt. It is an experience that isn't forgotten, even after 67 years. Most of the people on the train were military personnel going back to their bases. After several months, most of the personnel began to be discharged and left for home.

This is a small part of the story about the wreck, but I am sure people who read this will understand how bad it was.


Adm. Horacio Rivero Jr.: Surface Warrior, Unsung Latino Leader

Two months after the "Miracle at Midway" stopped the Japanese advance in the Pacific, the U.S. Navy was beginning the fight that would eventually lead back to Tokyo, a road that started in the South Pacific’s Solomon Islands landing Marines and soldiers on the Japanese held island of Guadalcanal.

It was August of 1942 and Lt. Cmdr. Horacio Rivero, Jr. was in the thick of the fight as the assistant gunnery officer on board the light cruiser USS San Juan (CL-54).

Having commissioned the ship only five months prior, Rivero had been training up his team that manned the ship's after batteries from the start. Now was their time to shine. Rivero was no stranger to sea duty, having spent a majority of his 11 years of active duty on surface ships.

"During this period Captain (then Lieutenant Commander) Rivero ably controlled the after batteries of the USS San Juan during the effective supporting fire in the landing of our Marines at Guadalcanal on August 7, 1942," reads his Bronze Star Medal with Combat “V” device citation.

"On the following day, when attacked by a large number of enemy shore-based torpedo planes, the batteries under his control shot down several of the attacking aircraft and inflicted hits on many others, contributing to their subsequent loss."

"While conducting a lone raid on the Gilbert Islands in October 1942, his batteries efficiently contributed to the sinking of two Japanese patrol vessels and the capture of sixteen prisoners," the citation detailed.

"On October 26, 1942, in the Battle of Santa Cruz, he superbly controlled the after batteries with devastating effect downing many enemy carrier-based aircraft. "

Better understood, it must be noted that the medal was awarded not for a singular action of heroism, but instead for the consistency, dependability, and sustained superior performance in combat that Rivero had demonstrated from Aug. 7, 1942 through April 24, 1943. He truly was a warfighting surface warrior.

Taking over as the gunnery officer, his service on the cruiser San Juan continued until late 1944 and was on board the ship through most of the South and Central Pacific campaigns where the ship was part of a covering force under command of Admiral William F. Halsey.

The San Juan saw action at Bougainville in the Solomons the capture of the Gilbert Islands in November 1943 during the series of carrier raids on Rabaul late that year and the attacks on Kwajalein in the Marshalls in February 1944.

In late 1944 he briefly returned to the United States to commission the cruiser USS Pittsburgh (CA-72), first as the gunnery officer and later as executive officer.

On June 5, 1945, a typhoon struck the ships of the Third Fleet, damaging 33, but Pittsburg was hit hardest. Rivero, now the ship's executive officer, is credited for the survival of the ship and crew.

During the raging storm, the ship's bow was snapped off by the wind and heavy seas "like the head of a matchstick." Imagine a ship limping back to port without a bow to break the sea waves.

Rivero is heralded for the ship’s survival and the direction he gave for preparations of the ship during the storm as well as the handling of damage control efforts once the bow was lost. For his quick and forward-thinking he was awarded with the Legion of Merit Medal.

". He was particularly outstanding in his intelligent and timely direction of the heads of Departments of the ship, and his immediate inspections of damaged and flooded portions of the ship under extremely hazardous conditions and at the risk of his own life," the citation read.

His actions "resulted in correct decisions being made, damage boundaries being correctly established and the efforts of the entire ship's personnel being correctly directed to the end that no lives were lost and it was possible to bring the ship safely to port."

The ship would later see action during the Iwo Jima and Okinawa campaigns and the first carrier raids on Tokyo.

These first two decades of his career were filled with conflict, during which he was able to demonstrate toughness and resiliency despite the challenges. Facing obstacles head-on and overcoming them, was a routine scenario for him.

A native of Ponce, Puerto Rico, but raised in Manatí, Horacio Rivero, Jr. was born May 16, 1910, to Margarita De Lucca Vda De Rivero and Horacio Rivero.

Upon graduation from Central High School in San Juan (now Santurce), Puerto Rico, he secured an appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis. His first time on a ship, and entering the United States, was on the voyage to Baltimore that delivered him to school on the Severn.

Four years later, he graduated with distinction, third among the 441 graduates of the Academy Class of 1931.

The role model example that Rivero provides for our Navy can be best summarized as one of the underdog, albeit a persistent one that demonstrates unmatched leadership with a knack for winning.

After the war, Rivero received command in 1948 of the destroyer USS William C. Lawe (DD-763). Again given command in 1951, this time of the transport USS Noble (APA-218), he led his ship and delivered the Marines to the amphibious assault of Inchon, Korea.

In flag rank, he commanded Destroyer Flotilla ONE. Later, he was personally selected by President Kennedy to take command of Amphibious Force, Atlantic Fleet during the Cuban Missile Crisis and subsequently lauded for his command's readiness during this period of national crisis.

Appointed the vice chief of naval operations in July 1964, he served as the Navy's number two admiral until February 1968, overseeing much of the operation of the Vietnam War, including the resurgence of the brown-water navy that he passionately advocated for.

When when he took the helm of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s Allied Forces, Southern Europe at the height of the Cold War, he was able to merge military power with our principles for deterrence and engagement amongst our allies.

". In the face of limited material resources, regional political upheavals, and the dramatically increased Soviet penetration of the Mediterranean, he persuasively rallied the common determination of Southern Region nations developed plans to counter the Soviet threat implemented the 'Flexible Response' strategy of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and intensively exercised the allied armies, navies and air forces in a variety of complex national and multinational maneuvers and exercises. " According to his Distinguished Service Medal Citation, given him upon his retirement in June of 1972.

It was no wonder then why he wouldn’t continue to serve the nation even after retiring from the Navy in 1971. Appointed by President Nixon, he served as the U.S. Ambassador to Spain from 1972 to 1974.

Demonstrating the pride he maintained for his island, he became the Honorary Chairman of the American Veterans' Committee for Puerto Rico Self-Determination.

Along with his decorations from the United States, he was recipient of the Order of Abdon Calderon from the Republic of Ecuador and the Order of Merito Naval from the Republic of Brazil.

Rivero passed away on Sept. 24, 2000 and is buried in Ft. Rosecrans National Cemetery on Point Loma in San Diego.

Even the word legendary falls shorts of the exemplary manner in which Rivero's service is remembered. Nearly 40-years in uniform and rising to four stars, Rivero serves as an example to all our career Surface Warriors, regardless of rank or background.

Without a ship to bear his name, it remains on each of us to reinforce his story and example for the generations of Sailors that follow particularly those Latino leaders in uniform.

The next time you consider overlooking someone or one of their ideas because of an accent, perceived social class, or their junior rank, remind yourself of Rivero — even the least expected, from the humblest of beginnings, with persistence, integrity, intellect and courage, can reach the summit of leadership within our organization.

Rivero may be an unsung hero, but his career proved he should be anything but.


CPO's at Work

Battle of Manila Bay, 1 May 1898. Commodore George Dewey (second from right) on the bridge of USS Olympia during the battle. Others present are (left to right): Samuel Ferguson (apprentice signal boy), John A. McDougall (Marine orderly) and Merrick W. Creagh (Chief Yeoman).

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 19-N-14187.)

USS Hist (1898-1911) Chief Petty Officer demonstrates the operation of a Maxim 1- pounder machine gun, circa May 1898.USS Topeka is fitting out in the background.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 03049.)

USS Prometheus (AR-3) Yeomen at work in the ship's Repair Office, circa 1919-20.

Note Chief Yeoman's uniform, telephone on bulkhead, typewriters and "bentwood" swivel chairs.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 03056.)

USS Prometheus (AR-3) Scene in a Carpenters' shop, circa 1919-20, with two Chief Petty Officers and another sailor at work.

(Photograph in the Library of Congress, DN-0070208, Chicago Daily News negatives collection, Chicago Historical Society.)

LT John Phillip Sousa, bandmaster at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station in North Chicago, Illinois, flanked by Chief Petty Officers (Bandmasters), at the head of Navy band on South Michigan Avenue in the Loop community are of Chicago, Illinois, 1918.

(Photograph in the Library of Congress, Call Number: LC-USE6- D-004247.)

Production. Diesel engines. A diesel engine produced for the Navy at a Midwest manufacturing plant, is inspected by a "five[sic]strip" chief petty officer

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 80-G-312021.)

Battle of Midway, June 1942. Corpsmen treating casualties on board USS Yorktown (CV-5), shortly after the carrier had been hit by Japanese bombs on 4 June 1942. The dead and wounded were members of the crew of 1.1" machine gun mount # 4, in the center background. They were struck by fragments from a bomb that exploded on the flight deck just aft of the midships elevator. This view looks directly to starboard from the front of the midships elevator. The aircraft crane is at left, with 1.1" gun mount # 3 visible in the upper left corner. Note bearded Chief Petty Officer walking by, flight deck clothing worn by some of those present and fire extinguisher in the lower left.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 97142.)

U.S. Marine Aid Station A casualty receives plasma from a U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman at a medical aid station somewhere near the Naktong River Front, during the defense of the Pusan Perimeter, 17 August 1950. Note First Class rating badge stenciled on the Corpsman's jacket. [Note: Stenciled badge is in fact that for a CPO. ---Vic]

(Photo by: SSgt. Robert Knoll. PhotoID : 20034283013 Submitted by: 15th MEU.)

AN NASIRIYAH, Iraq [April 2, 2003] - Chief [HMC] David Jones of the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable) holds the two-hour old newborn Rogenia Katham , daughter of Jamila Katham . She was born in the Battalion Landing Team 2/1's Battalion Aid Station after arriving at the 15th MEU's position here.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 92530.)

"Diver being suited-up on the ship's deck, in preparation for an underwater repair job, circa March 1914. Note the diver's telephone headset."

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 99834.)

"Partially suited diver (apparently a Chief Petty Officer, judging from the hat he is holding) on board the ship, circa March 1914."

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 80-GK-14209)

Caption: "Operation "Fishnet", Korea, 1952. North Korean refugees on board a U.S. Navy fast transport (APD) after they were rescued by Underwater Demolition Team members, during operations intended to reduce Communist Forces' food supplies by destroying North Korean fishing nets. Chief Petty Officer's jacket (right) indicates that the ship is USS Weiss (APD-135). Photograph is dated 16 September 1952. Note UDT rubber boats in the left background."

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # USN 1037076.)

USS Nautilus (SSN-571) Judges from the submarine's crew meet in the wardroom to chose the winning entry in the North Pole flag contest, during her North Pole cruise, 12 August 1958. Those present are (from left to right): Lieutenant John W. Harvey, USN Chief Engineman Hercules H. Nicholas, USN Commander R.F. Dobbins, Medical Corps, USN and Chief Hospitalman John A. Aberle , USN.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # USN 1143149.)

USS Taussig (DD-746) Seaman L.J. Kusak and Senior Chief Gunner's Mate A.A. Epperson, both of USS Dixie (AD-14), install a new 5"/38 gun in one of Taussig's gun mounts, at Subic Bay, Philippines, 1969.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # USN 1172267.)

USS William V. Pratt (DDG-44) Chief Personnelman Julius B. Simmons logs reports of simulated damage on a damage control plan of the ship, during a General Quarters drill, 13-26 May 1978. The ship was then taking part in Operation "Solid Shield 1978".

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 50969.)

USS Oklahoma (BB-37) Crewmen holding evacuated children, as refugees are embarked at Bilboa , Spain, during the Spanish Civil War, August 1936. These men have been identified as (from left to right): Lloyd A. Payne (possibly), Chief Petty Officer Fuchs, and Slajus . Note dog.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 63286.)

USS Florida (BB-30) Signalmen of the ship's Landing Force, before going ashore at Vera Cruz, Mexico, in April 1914. These men are identified as: Windrell , Repp , C.M.M., Green and Bishop (only five listed). Note their military pistol belts with suspenders, canteens and other field gear. Several men are wearing their "flat hats" beret-style, without grommets.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 80-G-19974.)

Battle of Midway, June 1942. Crew of the Patrol Squadron 23 (VP-23) PBY-5A "Catalina" patrol bomber that found the approaching Japanese fleet's Midway Occupation Force on the morning of 3 June 1942.

Those present are (standing, left to right): Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class R.J. Derouin Chief Aviation Radioman Francis Musser Ensign Hardeman (Copilot) Ensign J. H. Reid (Pilot)--on wheel-- and Ensign R.A. Swan (Navigator). Kneeling are (left to right): Aviation Machinist's Mate 1st Class J.F. Gammell (Naval Aviation Pilot) Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class J. Goovers and Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class P.A. Fitzpatrick. Names are as given on the original photographic mount card, in the custody of the National Archives.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 80-G-233267.)

Steward's Mates School, Naval Air Station, Seattle, Washington. Group of trainees, under Chief Steward Robert Nargrove , 26 April 1944. Their rifles are M1903 types. Note the Steward's Mates School flag.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 80-G-294865.)

Camp Robert Smalls, Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, Illinois. A Chief Petty Officer instructs members of the first class to attend the Negro Service School for Machinist's Mates, 30 July 1943.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 80-G-339804.)

Surrender of Japan, 1945. Japanese officers' briefcases are searched for possible weapons, in the wardroom of USS Nicholas (DD-449), as the destroyer carried them to confer with Allied representatives concerning the entry of U.S. and British warships into Sagami Wan and Tokyo Bay, 27 August 1945.

(Note: Chief Petty Officer in center.)

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 80-G-421187.)

USS Missouri (BB-63). Chief Gunner's Mate W.L. Stull (left) and Ensign R.H. Sprince relay an order to load all guns of turret one, during bombardment operations off Korea, October 1950.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 69785.)

USS Kearsarge (CVS-33). SDCS James R. Dawson presents the commissioning pennant to her last Commanding Officer, Captain Leonard M. Nearman , following the hauling down of the ship's colors during her decommissioning ceremonies, at Long Beach, California, 13 February 1970.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 97073.)

USS Pittsburgh (CA-72). Crewmen slip anchor stoppers in preparation for anchoring. On the order "let go", the anchor detail will knock out the single remaining stopper with a sledge hammer, starting the anchor on its way. Pittsburgh is at the Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington, during her initial post-reactivation trials, circa September 1951. She was recommissioned on 25 September. (Note Chief Petty Officer at left.)

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 97088.)

Navy Personnel Round Out Eight Months at UNC Advance Camp. John J. Lukasik, chief yeoman, USN, crosses off March 10, 1952, on a calendar in the Navy Administration Tent at the Base Camp. This date marks the end of the eighth month since the military armistice conferences first began. Along side the calendar can be seen folders containing a complete record of the conferences since their beginning on July 10, 1951. Chief Lukasik has been attached to the Naval Contingent at the UNC Advance Camp since the beginning of the conferences. He is chief petty officer in charge of reproducing and distributing transcripts of the record of proceedings.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 97164.)

Stranding of Thai Frigate Prasae , January 1951. "Thorin , D.W., APC, prepares to take off in his helicopter with another load of survivors from the Thailand corvette, the HMTS Prasae , which ran aground during a blinding snow storm off the coast of Korea. Other members of the helicopters stand guard as the rescue was affected behind enemy lines." (Quoted from original caption) Photo is dated 16 January 1951, but was taken several days earlier. Prasae went aground on the North Korean coast on 7 January 1951 and was destroyed after attempts to pull her off were unsuccessful. Helicopter is a Sikorski HO3S-1 of squadron HU-1. Men guarding the rescue operation are armed with M-3 submachine guns.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 73293.)

Navy Recruiting Office, circa 1914. Two Chief Petty Officers and another sailor in a recruiting office, probably in the New York City area, circa early 1914. Calendars on the wall are for February and April 1914.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 97007.)

USS Princeton (CV-37). Gunner's Mate Second Class W.F. Patton gives the "OK" signal after inspecting one of the ship's 5"/38 twin gun mounts, as she is being prepared for return to service from the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Standing on the deck nearby are Commander C.S. Judson, Jr., (left) and Chief Gunner's Mate L.W. Brugler . All three men had served in Princeton's Gunnery Department prior to her decommissioning in 1949. Photograph was released by the 13th Naval District Headquarters, Seattle, Washington, on 1 August 1950.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 53182.)

Navy Department, Washington, D.C. Navy and civilian personnel in an office in the Main Navy or Munitions Buildings, 1918. Note several Yeoman (F) among the women present and (male) Chief Yeoman in lower left.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 95082.)

Yeomen (F), U.S. Naval Reserve Force. New enlistees receive training in telegraphy from a Chief Petty Officer, at the Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, Illinois, in 1917. Some of these women are in uniform while others are still wearing civilian attire.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 52950.)

Chief Yeoman (F) McBride. Probably taken during the Victory Liberty Loan parade in New York City, May 1919.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 80-G-17426.)

Grumman F4F-3 fighter undergoes maintenance on the hangar deck of USS Enterprise (CV-6), 28 October 1941. The plane bears the markings of Fighting Squadron Three (VF-3), including a "Felix the Cat" insignia under the cockpit windshield. The part held by the Chief Petty Officer in the foreground bears the number 3973, and is possibly the Bureau # of this plane (# 3973 was the Bu# of an F4F-3).

Note aircraft propellers stowed in the hangar overhead.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 82712.)

USS Macon (ZRS-5). View in the airship's auxiliary control station, located in the lower vertical fin, circa 1933-1935. [Note Chief Petty Officer at left.]

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 90493.)

USS Colorado (BB-45). Chief Petty Officers study books on "Personnel Management", in the battleship's "Chief's Quarters", circa 1923-25.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 102847.)

Chief Specialist Robert William ("Bob") Feller. By a 40mm quadruple anti-aircraft gun mount, probably on board USS Alabama (BB-60) in late 1942 or early 1943. The original caption (released 5 March 1943) reads: "GUN CAPTAIN FELLER -- Bob Feller, one of the finest baseball pitchers of the era, is all set to do a different kind of pitching these days. As a Chief Specialist, he is the captain of a 40mm gun crew aboard one of Uncle Sam's new battleships. The former American Leaguer joined the U.S. Navy as a physical education instructor and later applied for Gunnery School. Subsequently he was assigned to sea duty and here he is -- grin and all -- beside his guns on a cold winter day."

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 99450.)

USS Penguin (Minesweeper # 33) close astern of USS Scranton (ID # 3511), as a Chief Petty Officer is "putting the heaving line 60 ft." between the two ships, circa 28 March 1919. Note the line's weight in the air above Penguin's bow.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 80-G-652604.)

Navy and Marine Corps Reserve Training Center, Trenton, New Jersey Dedication of the bell from USS Lawrence (DD-250) at the Reserve Training Center, 2 October 1954. Those present in the photograph include (from left to right): Electronics Technician 3rd Class R.F. Gilton , USNR Dr. H.H. Bisbee, of Burlington, N.J. Mr. Anthony Greski , Mayor of Burlington, N.J. Lieutenant Commander C.W. Summers, USN, Commanding Officer of the Reserve Training Center Chief Yeoman C.W. Green, USNR, Senior Stationkeeper and Sergeant H.L. Pancost , USMCR.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 80-GK-11913)

The Sixth Fleet Band, led by Chief Musician Eugene H. Albert, USN Performs on the quarterdeck of USS Salem (CA-139), as the Sixth Fleet's flagship was visiting Toulon, France, early in her 1951 Mediterranean deployment. The photograph was received by the Naval Photographic Center on 18 June 1951.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 80-GK-3736)

USS Alaska (CB-1). Chief Quartermaster John P. Overholt taking a sun sighting with a sextant from the ship's navigating bridge. Taken circa 6 March 1945, during the Iwo Jima operation. Taking notes on the observations is Quartermaster Third Class Clark R. Bartholomew.

(U. S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 50183.)

USS Maine (1895-1898). "Gunner's Gang", photographed in one of the ship's torpedo rooms.

Halftoned photograph, published in Uncle Sam's Navy, 1898. (Note Chief Petty Officer with gold lace chevrons and individual at far left who is likely then Mess Attendant and later Chief Gunner's Mate John Henry "Dick"Turpin .)

(Photograph in Library of Congress. Call Number: LC-D4-20534.)

One of the most important of the CPO photographs is this one of the Chief Quarters on the USS Maine taken by Edward H. Hart circa 1896. Aside from the historical importance of the Maine and the fact that some or all of those pictured likely lost their lives when the Maine was blown up in Havana, they have to be among the first Chief Petty Officers of the U. S. Navy and in photographs of that period one of only two I have seen where gold lace chevrons are being worn --- in this one by the Chief Gunner's Mate at lower right. For the other photo, see No. 42, that includes who is likely the same CGM with his "gunner's gang".

Chief Petty Officers on the list of officers, sailors, and marines on board of USS Maine, who were killed or drowned when that vessel was wrecked in the harbor of Havana, February 15, 1898, or who subsequently died of their injuries. There were no Chief Petty Officers listed among the survivors.

Becker, Jakob , Chief Machinist Brofeldt , Arthur, Chief Gunner's Mate Faubel , George D., Chief Machinist Gardner, Thomas J., Chief, Yeoman Graham, James A., Chief Yeoman Hamilton, John, Chief Carpenter's Mate League, James M., Chief Yeoman Mero , Eldon H., Chief Machinist O'Conner, James, Chief Boatswain's Mate Rushworth , William, Chief Machinist Sellers, Walter S., Apothecary White, Charles O., Chief Master-at-Arms Wilson, Robert, Chief Quartermaster.

Identifiable ratings in the photo --- left to right, seated: Chief Machinist*, unknown, Chief Machinist*, Chief Gunner's Mate left to right, standing: Chief machinist*, unknown (maybe CY), unknown, Chief Carpenter's Mate. (*- mate would not be added to Chief Machinist until later.)


On June 20, 1927, he received an appointment from the Honorable Felix Cordova Davila, Puerto Rico's Resident Commissioner to attend the United States Naval Academy. His nickname "Rivets" came about in the academy as a result of an officer who had trouble reading Rivero's name on his uniform. ΐ] On June 4, 1931, he graduated third in a class of 441 from the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. Rivero's first assignment was aboard the USS Northampton (CA-26). From 1932 to 1936 he served aboard the following ships: USS Chicago (CA-29), USS New Mexico (BB-40), USS California (BB-44) and USS Pennsylvania (BB-38). He earned his Master's Degree in Electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1940 and in 1941 married Hazel Hooper. Α]

World War II [ edit | edit source ]

During World War II, he served aboard the USS San Juan (CL-54) as a gunnery officer and was involved in providing artillery cover for Marines landing on Guadalcanal, Marshall Islands, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa. For his service he was awarded the Bronze Star with Combat “V”. Rivero was reassigned to the USS Pittsburgh (CA-72). The Pittsburgh’s bow had been torn off during a typhoon and Rivero’s strategies saved his ship without a single life lost. For his actions he was awarded the Legion of Merit. He also participated in the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, the attack on Bougainville in the Solomons, the capture of the Gilbert Islands and a series of carrier raids on Rabaul. On June 5, 1945, Rivero was present during the first carrier raids against Tokyo during operations in the vicinity of Nansei Shoto. Ώ]

Rivero served as Assistant to the Assistant Chief of Naval Operations (Special Weapons) from August 1945 to February 1946. From February 1946 to June 1947 he served as a technical assistant on the Staff of Commander Joint Task Force One for Operation Crossroads, and was on the Staff of Commander, Joint Task Force Seven during the atomic weapons tests in Eniwetok in 1948. Β]

Korean War [ edit | edit source ]

After the war, Rivero commanded the USS William C. Lawe (DD-763) and during the Korean War the USS Noble (APA-218). Under his command, the Noble steamed to Korea to participate in the September Inchon amphibious assault. Thereafter, the Noble assisted in the transport of U.S. and foreign troops and equipment to and from the Korean combat zone. In July 1953, the Noble participated in Operation Big Switch, moving Communist North Korean prisoners from Koje Do to Inchon pursuant to the armistice agreement. Γ]

Rivero studied nuclear weaponry at the National War College and in 1954 he became Assistant Chief of Staff for Naval Operations. In 1955, he was promoted to the rank of Rear Admiral and was a member of the Staff of the Commander in Chief, Western Atlantic Area. Ώ]

Cuban Missile Crisis [ edit | edit source ]

The Cuban Missile Crisis was a tense confrontation between the Soviet Union and the United States over the Soviet deployment of nuclear missiles in Cuba. On October 22, 1962, Admiral Rivero, who served as Vice Chief of Naval Operations from 1961 to 1968, was the commander of the American fleet sent by President John F. Kennedy to set up a quarantine (blockade) of the Soviet ships in an effort to stop the Cold War from escalating into World War III. On October 28, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev ordered the removal of the Soviet missiles in Cuba, and Kennedy ordered an end of the quarantine of Cuba on November 20, bringing an end to the crisis. Δ] Ε] On July 31, 1964, Rivero became the first Puerto Rican, and first Hispanic to become a four-star Admiral in the modern era US Navy.

Vietnam War [ edit | edit source ]

During the Vietnam War, Rivero oversaw the day-to-day work of the Navy as the Vice Chief of Naval Operations. He was a stern supporter of a “brown-water navy,” or riverine force, on the rivers of South Vietnam. Ώ]

NATO commander [ edit | edit source ]

From 1968 until his retirement from the Navy in 1972, Admiral Rivero was the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's commander in chief of the Allied Forces in Southern Europe. He was responsible of the land, sea and air forces of five nations deployed in the Mediterranean area: Italy, Greece, Turkey, Britain and the United States. During his years as commander, there were some 215,000 of the 310,000 American troops in Europe stationed in West Germany. At the time, Rivero believed that any withdrawal of United States troops from West Germany might affect the strength of the United States Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean. ΐ]


Douglas Dietrich: "I was the first to expose the Bad SPN Codes" Lie

In a pathetic and disjointed response to my comments regarding his hatred of the US Military and veterans, in particular, Douglas Dietrich claims he "has done more for veterans than even Dannion Brinkley."

Dietrich cited his 2011 interview with John B Well on Coast To Coast AM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KbbEOj6z3Jg as his being the first person to expose the use of "Severance Codes" or "SPNs" as harmful to veterans from 1947 to 1973.

Douglas Dietrich had absolutely nothing to do with "exposing" this alleged scandal. The man who did, and was still involved in the issue was Edwin H. Crosby III.

Spin Codes - Legal Action
By: Edwin Crosby

"The author of this story, Edwin Crosby, served in the USAF from 1966-1971. He volunteered to go to Vietnam and served in MACVSOG, 15th Special Operations Squadron, Nha Trang, AB, RVN from November 1968 to June 1970.


His lawsuit began in March of 1976, having discovered in February of 1976, he had a BAD 'Spin Code' number. The case was originally filed in the US District Court, Northern District of New York, Syracuse.

He has been fighting this case on behalf of all veterans and has been instrumental in having D.O.D. change the DD-214 many times to prevent future damage to other veterans.

Beginning JUNE 11, 1956, under D.O.D. Instruction 1336.3, DOD ordered the military departments to begin putting a coded number on the main employment reference document of veterans. This document known as the DD-214 is intended to be presented to employers by veterans seeking employment and benefits.

According to Plaintiff's Exhibit NO: 6, D.O.D. Instruction 1336.1, dated September 1, 1966, SUBJECT - Standardization of Forms for Report of Transfer or Discharge of Members of the Armed Forces of the U.S., there were to be 8 or more copies of DD-214 made. Copy one to the veteran, other copies eventually went to State Adjutant General, VA Data Processing Center, Austin, TX., State Director Selective Service, Nat. Military Records Center, St. Louis, Mo.

As of 1977, nearly 20 million veterans had a coded number. This is SHOCKING as in 1974 D.O.D. told Congress that only a couple hundred thousand had a code number. Moreover, in 1974 DOD told Congress they would stop the " SPN " coding system, however, in 1972, they were already changing the system to " SPD " (separation program designator ). They deceived Congress and the American People. Millions of veterans with an Honorable Discharge have a " BAD " coded number."

7 Part Series " THE SECRET CODE ON VETERAN'S DD214" August 2007

Edwin H. Crosby YouTube Channel:

Edwin H Crosby passed away on March 18, 2019:

This story, as revealed by Mr. Crosby, also reveals that then Delaware Rep. Joe Biden and Arizona Sen John McCain were both involved in the government cover-up at the time (the early 1980s). In addition, the info of litigation was later presented by Sen Dick Durban to President Barack Obama who also did nothing.

All of this as a result of an SPN Code ("411 Overseas Returnee") on the DD-214 of Mr. Crosby in 1970. WHEN DOUGLAS DIETRICH WAS 4 YEARS OLD!

But I guess that since Mr. Crosby is now deceased, Dietrich will continue to lie and somehow work this into his fake resume as well.


The halting of Titanic's sinking

One thing has puzzled me about Titanic's sinking process for a while now. That being, the rate of the sinking. For the first 40 minutes after the collision, Titanic experienced an incredible rate of flooding in the forward 5 compartments. The flooding was so fast, in fact, that AB Poingdestre found himself waist deep in seawater when a bulkhead separating third class and crew spaces on E Deck, which is pretty high above the waterline, gave way, not even an hour after the collision.

After that, Titanic seemed to stop sinking for over an hour.

Lookout Symons stated that water was up to the second row of portholes under the ship's name when lifeboat no. 1 was pulling away from the dying liner at about 1:15 a.m. Fred Barrett noted that the focsle wasn't even underwater when pulling away from Titanic at about 1:45 a.m. Fourth Officer Boxhall noted that water was up to E Deck when pulling away from Titanic's starboard side at about 1:55 a.m.

The question is, what exactly kept Titanic from settling further than E Deck for such a long time? Is it reaching equilibrium? Am I reading too much into things? I'd love to hear the opinions of you guys on this.

Aaron_2016

I believe the downward tilt had indeed stalled for quite some time as the water began to move aft and flood the ship bodily, causing her to rest lower and lower as her portholes dipped below the surface in unison.

Survivor Edwina Troutt said:
"As we were rowing away we could see the Titanic gradually sinking. This row of lights would disappear and the next row of lights disappeared."

Survivor Violet Jessop said:
"I started unconsciously to count the decks by the rows of lights. One, two, three, four, five, six. Then again, one, two, three, four, five. There were only five decks now. Then I started all over again. Only four now. She was getting lower in the water, I could not any longer deny it. Only three decks now, and still not a list to one side or the other. I watched Titanic give a lurch forward, one of the huge funnels toppled off like a cardboard model, falling into the sea with a fearful roar."

Survivor Lawrence Beesley noticed a very slight trim towards the bow when he left the ship. He said:
"The Titanic had sunk by the head until the lowest portholes in the bows were under the sea, and the portholes in the stern were lifted above the normal height. We rowed away from her in the quietness of the night, hoping and praying with all our hearts that she would sink no more and the day would find her still in the same position as she was then."

Albert Pearcey left the ship in one of the collapsible boats very close to the end. He was asked:

Q - Did you notice whether she was down by the head?
A - No, I did not notice.
Q - Did you notice whether she appeared to be going deeper into the water forward? Did you notice that?
A - No.
Q - Did you see the vessel go down?
A - Yes.
Q - Were you facing her when she went down?
A - Yes.

Rob Lawes

Aaron_2016

We also have the ship's baker Charles Joughin who was asked:

Q - On E deck are the portholes in practice opened from time to time?
A - Very, very often we keep them open the whole of the passage.

This may have greatly affected how the Titanic flooded.

Henry Sincic

Aaron: For sure! Wilding's famous 12 square feet would be greatly increased if the ports went under. Emily Ryerson said that she saw water flowing into open portholes on the water line. This would not only speed up the flooding but also cause the ship to heel more to port.

Rob: Would it then be correct to say that Titanic was at first sinking due to added weight, but after the water reached the outside water line it would then be sinking due to loss of buoyancy?

Rob Lawes

The adding of weight and the reduction of buoyancy go hand in hand since:

Buoyancy force = weight of object in empty space − weight of object immersed in fluid

An object floating on water will displace an amount of water equal to its apparent immersed weight. This is known as it's displacement. Providing this is less than it's actual weight (I.E. if you could weigh the whole ship out of water) then it's going to float.

As the ship fills with water it's apparent immersed weight increases plus, with the hull lifting out of the water, the amount of volume of the hull in the water decreases changing the area in which the buoyant upward force acts on the hull.

Henry Sincic

Aaron, Rob, thank you for your responses. I would just like to correct myself on something. I stated in my first post the Symons saw the ports on E deck going underwater at 1:15 a.m.

Questions 11490-11496 in the British Inquiry actually indicate that Symons was watching D deck going under, not E deck, because it was "the first row under the well deck".

Augusto Félix Solari

One thing has puzzled me about Titanic's sinking process for a while now. That being, the rate of the sinking. For the first 40 minutes after the collision, Titanic experienced an incredible rate of flooding in the forward 5 compartments. The flooding was so fast, in fact, that AB Poingdestre found himself waist deep in seawater when a bulkhead separating third class and crew spaces on E Deck, which is pretty high above the waterline, gave way, not even an hour after the collision.

After that, Titanic seemed to stop sinking for over an hour.

Lookout Symons stated that water was up to the second row of portholes under the ship's name when lifeboat no. 1 was pulling away from the dying liner at about 1:15 a.m. Fred Barrett noted that the focsle wasn't even underwater when pulling away from Titanic at about 1:45 a.m. Fourth Officer Boxhall noted that water was up to E Deck when pulling away from Titanic's starboard side at about 1:55 a.m.

The question is, what exactly kept Titanic from settling further than E Deck for such a long time? Is it reaching equilibrium? Am I reading too much into things? I'd love to hear the opinions of you guys on this.

Samuel Halpern

Aaron_2016

4th officer Boxhall described the ship sinking "bodily" and how the suction caused great difficulty (possibly from the open porthole windows) as he tried to get his boat on the port side and around the stern towards the gangway doors on the starboard side. He described the difficulty with the suction:


"The boat seemed to be drawn closer to the ship. I think, myself, that there was more suction while the ship was settling bodily. That was shortly after we were lowered into the boat. I think there was more suction then than there was when she actually went down."

Q - Would there be any suction there?
A - Well, I felt it I saw it by the work we had pulling it round the ship’s stern seeing she was only a small boat, I judged there was quite a lot of suction.

Q - Did you feel you were in danger from suction?
A - Yes.

Q - With some difficulty you rowed round to the starboard side of the ship?
A - Yes, round the stern.

Q - Why was there suction at this time?
A - The ship settling down badly, I suppose.

"I had great difficulty in getting the boat around there. There was suction. I was hoping to be able to get alongside of the ship again. I thought it was wiser not to go any closer."

Q - Was it settling down rapidly. Could you see it settling down at this time?
A - Yes, I could see her settling down I was watching the lines of lights.

Samuel Halpern

Aaron_2016

His boat was one of the last to leave the ship and I believe the only one to row from the forward port side all the way aft and around the stern towards the starboard side. The ship would have been listing over to port and possibly was affected by open portholes which sucked the water in and drew his lifeboat dangerously towards the ship as she listed more to port. He was so close that he thought he may have passed underneath the propeller blades as he went around the stern to the starboard side. He said when he finally reached the starboard side he could not find any other lifeboats on that side and he believed they had all rowed away towards the other ship off the port bow. This I believe would make his experience rather unique, especially as his boat was the only one to obey the Captain's orders and attempted to return to the ship not long before she went down.

Samuel Halpern

Aaron_2016

Miss Allen was in his boat and said - "We were rowed round the stern to the starboard side and away from the ship, as our boat was a small one and Boxhall feared the suction."

They did not have enough people to row sufficiently away in a hurry but they did manage to row all the way aft and around to the starboard side. Boxhall felt the suction drawing the boat in and being an experienced sailor he may have felt this effect more than others, especially if their attention was directed on other things.

What I find odd from their accounts is that Frank Osman - who was in their boat said, "She exploded, broke in halves, and it seemed to me as if all the engines and everything that was in the after part slid out into the forward part, and the after part came up right again." Yet Boxhall who was in his boat said the ship sank intact, and Miss Allen who was also inches away in the same boat said - "We saw her plunge distinctively, bow first and intact." Is it possible that in the darkness key events were witnessed by some and missed by others despite them all being in the same lifeboat? Boxhall had his career to think of and possibly had to obey orders and deny the break up, and Miss Allen had put in a claim for $2,427.80 in lost possessions. Did they accept her claim under one condition - that she deny the ship broke when asked?

Daniel A. Soto

Miss Allen was in his boat and said - "We were rowed round the stern to the starboard side and away from the ship, as our boat was a small one and Boxhall feared the suction."

They did not have enough people to row sufficiently away in a hurry but they did manage to row all the way aft and around to the starboard side. Boxhall felt the suction drawing the boat in and being an experienced sailor he may have felt this effect more than others, especially if their attention was directed on other things.

What I find odd from their accounts is that Frank Osman - who was in their boat said, "She exploded, broke in halves, and it seemed to me as if all the engines and everything that was in the after part slid out into the forward part, and the after part came up right again." Yet Boxhall who was in his boat said the ship sank intact, and Miss Allen who was also inches away in the same boat said - "We saw her plunge distinctively, bow first and intact." Is it possible that in the darkness key events were witnessed by some and missed by others despite them all being in the same lifeboat? Boxhall had his career to think of and possibly had to obey orders and deny the break up, and Miss Allen had put in a claim for $2,427.80 in lost possessions. Did they accept her claim under one condition - that she deny the ship broke when asked?

Robert fletcher

One thing has puzzled me about Titanic's sinking process for a while now. That being, the rate of the sinking. For the first 40 minutes after the collision, Titanic experienced an incredible rate of flooding in the forward 5 compartments. The flooding was so fast, in fact, that AB Poingdestre found himself waist deep in seawater when a bulkhead separating third class and crew spaces on E Deck, which is pretty high above the waterline, gave way, not even an hour after the collision.

After that, Titanic seemed to stop sinking for over an hour.

Lookout Symons stated that water was up to the second row of portholes under the ship's name when lifeboat no. 1 was pulling away from the dying liner at about 1:15 a.m. Fred Barrett noted that the focsle wasn't even underwater when pulling away from Titanic at about 1:45 a.m. Fourth Officer Boxhall noted that water was up to E Deck when pulling away from Titanic's starboard side at about 1:55 a.m.

The question is, what exactly kept Titanic from settling further than E Deck for such a long time? Is it reaching equilibrium? Am I reading too much into things? I'd love to hear the opinions of you guys on this.

As long as the ship could make sternway, they should have continued to the closest port.

As long as the Titanic could make sternway, they should have done that immediately after the collision and started heading to the closest port in reverse.
This would have kept the pressure down in the boilers since they were very much stoked up at the time, would have stopped the flooding in the next aft compartments as the water would have flowed away from them when making sternway, and would have given them time to get lifeboats ready on the Titanic, and time for the Carpathia to close the distance and send lifeboats only if necessary. As long as the Titanic was able to make sternway and stop any further flooding they should not stop for Carpathia. Carpathia should follow them to the closest port as well. Also a tugboat could have been dispatched to meet the Titanic and tow her astern the rest of the way to port.
The USS Pittsburg lost a large portion of her bow and made it back to port in a typhoon. Water tight bulkheads were sealed though. The Titanic could not seal hers, that is why she would have to run in reverse. In the calm weather they had it would have been much easier. She would have occassionally had to use one of the outboard propellers in the ahead direction to help steer. USN Ships--USS Pittsburgh (CA-72) -- Loss of Bow, 5 June 1945


Divers work on bow of USS Pittsburg (CA-72), June 1945 - History

Royal Navy Log Books of the World War 1 Era

HMS VALIANT &ndash February 1920 to February 1921, Atlantic Fleet (including Home Waters and Spain)

Edited by Kay Smith, Naval Enthusiast, Southampton, England

HMS Valiant (Photo Ships, click images to enlarge)

Dreadnought Battleship, Queen Elizabeth-class

Pendant Nos. 34 (1914), A6 (1.18), 43 (4.18). Launched 4.11.14 Fairfield. 27,500 tons, 640(oa), 600(pp)x90x30ft. Turbine 75000shp, 25kts. Armament: 8-15in, 14-6in, 2-3in AA, 4-21in tt. Armour: 13in sides, 3in deck, 11in guns. 5th BS attached to Battlecruiser Force, Grand Fleet from completion. Battle Honour (and link to despatches, casualties, awards) Jutland 31 May 1916. Sold 19.3.48, BU Arnott Young, Cairnryan. (British Warships 1914-1919)

Laid down 31/1/13, launched 4/11/14, comp 2/16, commissioned at Govan in January 1916 and joined 5th BS at Scapa Flow on 3 March. Fought at Jutland without sustaining damage. Damaged in collision with Warspite, 24 August 1916 and repaired 26 August-18 September. From 1919 served with Atlantic Fleet and then Mediterranean Fleet. Partially modernised 1929-30, and rebuilt 1937-39 for service in Second World War. Paid off in July 1945 and sold for BU in 1948. (Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1906-21)

British Isles Bases - Selected Charts

British Naval Bases Worldwide - Selected Charts

1. Latitude/longitude, including for days in port, show representative decimal positions for each day, as calculated by the Old Weather project's analysis program. As such, they differ by varying amounts from the positions recorded, usually at noon, in the log pages. In addition, some latitudes/longitudes have been amended in edited logs for errors in the logs, for errors in identifying locations by the analysis program, or simply for greater accuracy. In all cases, refer to the log-page scans for the positions as originally recorded. Not all log pages contain this information and the ships' positions have therefore often been estimated.

2. Full account of any day is available by clicking on the link above that day. Groups of links refer to log book covers and introductory information some may be blank.

Positions (Latitude and Longitude) are given for noon each day, correcting or estimating the position when appropriate. If exact times are not indicated in the log they have, when appropriate, been estimated from the position of the entries (which show times on the left hand side of the log page).

Information about sea state is based on the Sea Disturbance Scale where &ldquorough to very rough&rdquo indicates waves 5 to 10 feet from peak to trough, &ldquohigh&rdquo indicates waves of 11 to 15 feet, &ldquovery high&rdquo indicates wave height of 16 to 35 feet and &ldquophenomenal&rdquo indicates waves of 36 feet and above.

A note is made of numbers on the sick list where this is 5 or more.

This and other information from the log is included in square brackets [not in italics] if it is not to be found under &ldquoRemarks&rdquo on the right hand side of the page.

Additional information about geographical locations, terminology and about merchant and foreign naval ships encountered has been provided where identification is reasonably certain, by means of embedded links within the text.

There is more information about the ship here and here.

THE VOYAGES OF HMS VALIANT 1920-1921

(Maps prepared using Journey Plotter, developed by Maikel. The Plots can only be approximate. They are made by joining-up positions on successive days, and sometimes positions are not given. There will therefore be occasions when the ship appears to have travelled overland)

LOGS FOR FEBRUARY 1920

[Left hand side of blue cover of Ship&rsquos Log]

[Right hand side of blue cover of Ship&rsquos Log for the period Commencing Friday 20 th February 1920, Ending Wednesday 9 th February 1921]

[Blank page, inside of blue cover]

[Blank page, inside of blue cover]

[Internal cover of Log]

This Log is to be kept from the time the Ship is Commissioned until she is paid off when it is to be transmitted as directed by the Admiralty Instructions.

The Name and Address of the Officer to whom the acknowledgment of receipt should be sent by the Deputy Cashier in charge, Royal Victoria Yard, Deptford, is to be inserted by the Ship here.

Name: The Commanding Officer

Address: HMS Valiant, C/o GPO London.

LOG of HMS &ldquoVALIANT&rdquo. Commanded by Captain Horace W Longden RN.


Watch the video: The Underwater War on the USS Drum. History Traveler Episode 168 (May 2022).