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HMS Caroline

HMS Caroline


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HMS Caroline

HMS Caroline was the name ship of the Caroline class of light cruisers, and is the only survivor of the battle of Jutland still afloat. She entered service as leader of the 4th Destroyer Flotilla of the Grand Fleet in December 1914. From February-November 1915 she was part of the 1st Light Cruiser Squadron, then spent the rest of the war with the 4th Light Cruiser Squadron, initially under the overall command of Commodore Goodenough, based at Rosyth. In August 1915 she took part in the hunt for the German minelayer Meteor.

At the battle of Jutland Caroline and her squadron formed part of the anti-submarine screen for the battleships as they rushed south towards Beatty’s battlecruisers. During the main battle she took part in the destroyer battle between the main fleets (7.15-7.30pm). Towards the end of the main action, her squadron caught sight of a group of German capital ships, believed to be their battlecruisers and pre-dreadnaught battleships, and fired two torpedoes at them.

In October 1917 the Caroline was amongst the cruisers deployed in an attempt to find the German fleet as it attacked a Scandinavian convoy, patrolling off the Norwegian coast.

During the 1916-1917 the 13pdr AA gun was replaced by two 3in/20cwt anti-aircraft guns. In 1917-18 she was equipped with an aircraft runway, and high speed sweeps or explosive paravanes, an anti-submarine weapon.

After the war HMS Caroline served in the East Indies (1919-1922), before becoming the harbour training ship for the Ulster Division of the RNVR. During the Second World War she returned to active duty as the administration centre for convoy escort ships based at Londonderry. She is still afloat in Belfast, acting as a training ship, and is the second oldest commissioned warship in the Royal Navy (after HMS Victory). She is the only warship to fight at the battle of Jutland still afloat.

Displacement (loaded)

4,733t

Top Speed

28.5kts

Armour – deck

1in

- belt

3in-1in

- conning tower

6in

Length

446ft

Armaments

Two 6in Mk XII guns
Eight 4in quick firing Mk IV guns
One 13pdr anti-aircraft gun
Four 3pdr guns
Four 21in above-water torpedo tubes

Crew complement

301

Launched

29 September 1914

Completed

December 1914

Fate

Still commissioned warship

Captains

H. Ralph Crooke (1915, 1916)

Books on the First World War |Subject Index: First World War


HMS Caroline

Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 10/29/2020 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.

The Battle of Jutland of May 31st, 1916 - June 1st, 1916 was the notable clash of the British "Grant Fleet" and the German Empire's "High Seas Fleet" during the fighting of World War 1 (1914-1918). The battle marked the largest of its kind on water during the whole of the war and the only one to involve battleships on a large scale. With both sides claiming the victory, the battle was viewed as inconclusive - the Allies managing to keep the German fleet contained for the remainder of the war though at the loss of more Royal Navy ships than German in the engagement.

One of the participants of the battle was HMS Caroline, a C-class light cruiser belonging to a 28-strong class of fighting ships (these built across seven distinct groups). The design was developed specifically to contend with the unforgiving North Sea environment, the body of Atlantic water that separates Britain from Western and Northern Europe coastlines. Through sound design and wartime results, the ships of the class proved their worth in the conflict and the post-war period, noted for their general ruggedness.

HMS Caroline was laid down on January 28th, 1914 by shipbuilder Cammell Laird and launched on September 29th of that year. She was formally commissioned on December 4th, 1914 and fought under the motto of "Tenax Propositi" ("Tenacious of Purpose"). As of 2020, she is the only surviving member of the Battle of Jutland, preserved as a floating museum in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

The vessel had a triple smoke funnel arrangement when viewed in the side profile. The bow was largely unobstructed and the bridge superstructure jutted at the aft-end of the forecastle with an integrated main mast. The funnels sat near midships and a secondary superstructure followed with another mast. A third, pole-type mast was seated still aft. The hull line was noticeably raised at the forecastle and stepped before midships but ran unbroken for the length of the craft. Aboard was a typical crew complement of 325 personnel and armor protection reached up to 3 inches at the belt and 1 inch across the decks.

As a C-class cruiser, Caroline displaced 3,750 tons under normal loads and could exceed 4,700 tons when fully laden. Dimensions included a bow-to-stern length of 446 feet with a beam measuring 41.5 feet, and a draught down to 16 feet. Power was from 6 x Oil-fired boiler units feeding 4 x Parsons geared steam turbines developing 40,000 horsepower used to drive 4 x shafts under stern. This provided the ship with headway speeds (in ideal conditions) of nearly 29 knots with a range out to 5,900 nautical miles.

As built, armament centered on a primary of 2 x 6" (152mm) BL /45 caliber Mk XII guns backed by 8 x 4" (102mm) /45 caliber Mk V secondary guns and a single 6-pounder (57mm) Hotchkiss cannon. 4 x 21" (533mm) torpedo tubes were also carried. Later, her armament suite was revised to included 2 x 3" (76mm) Anti-Aircraft (AA) guns in place of the 4" QF weapons and the 6-pounder Hotchkiss was deleted.

During World War 1, Caroline was a constant North Sea presence and became part of the Grand Fleet almost as soon as she was commissioned. By the time of Jutland, she was part of the 4th Light Cruiser Squadron and, at one point, was finished with a "fly-off" platform to serve Royal Navy Air Service / Royal Air Force aircraft - a novel, yet ground-breaking concept for the time. She served in her position until November 1918 - which saw the end of the war through the Armistice.

In the post-war years (1919 onwards), she was reassigned to the East Indies and ultimately recalled to be placed in reserve in 1922. In February of 1924, the ship was recommissioned to be used for training at Belfast, Northern Ireland. With the arrival of World War 2 (1939-1945), Caroline was set up as the Royal Navy HQ at Belfast - the harbor's strategic position growing in value with each passing month of the conflict. After the Second World War, Caroline was placed into Volunteer Reserve status and continued training new generations of Royal Navy personnel. In 1951, she was given a refit at Belfast and served in her teaching role until formally decommissioned for good on March 31st, 2011 with efforts to preserve her proving successful.


HMS Caroline – a naval aviation pioneer

The veteran WW1 cruiser HMS Caroline, now subject to preservation as a museum ship, is a little-known pioneer of naval aviation. As restoration work is now underway, much attention will rightly be devoted to the ship’s role in the Battle of Jutland, the major engagement between the German High Seas Fleet and the British Grand Fleet in June 1916. However, the following year, the C-class cruiser HMS Caroline became one of the earliest operational ‘aircraft carriers’.
HMS Caroline can be seen at the Alexandra Graving Dock in Belfast, and although it will be some time before she is open to the public, it is possible to inspect the vessel externally from a very short distance. She differs somewhat from her WW1 appearance, mainly in the lack of guns and the large drill hall built amidships, but in many respects is still in remarkably original condition.

There are three surviving WW1 warships in the UK today – HMS President (formerly HMS Saxifrage), currently moored on the Thames, HM Monitor M.33 in dry dock at Portsmouth, and the Caroline. It is perhaps a mark of how far naval flying advanced from its embryonic state in 1914 that two of the three vessels have important links to naval aviation. (Read more about M.33 here).

Experiments in launching aircraft from warships had begun in the years before the First World War, almost as soon as aeroplanes became a practical means of transport. Eugene Ely took off and landed a Curtiss pusher from anchored US warships in October 1910, and just over a year later, in January 1912, Lieutenant C.R. Samson flew a Short S.38 from a ramp mounted to the bow of HMS Africa. The Royal Navy’s experiments were somewhat more sustained than those of the US Navy, and included the first take-off from a ship at sea, in May 1912. HMS Hermes was commissioned the following year as the parent vessel for the Aeroplane and Airship section, with a hangar and launching ramp fitted. Four cruisers had fixed ramps fitted and carried floatplanes in the early part of WW1, but the practical difficulties proved too difficult and, from August 1915, naval aviation from ships was restricted to dedicated seaplane carriers.

Nevertheless, the value of flying aircraft directly from warships at sea was recognised, and trials with launching ramps took place aboard the battle cruisers HMS Renown and HMAS Australia in 1917. One reason it had become important to find ways of launching high-performance aircraft at sea was the increasing threat to naval operations by German naval zeppelins. Much has been made of the early strategic bombing role these aircraft fulfilled, but of equal significance was their ability to reconnoitre for the German navy, using their excellent range and loitering ability. Royal Navy operations could lose the element of surprise at a stroke, with no possibility of hitting back.

It was around this time that fitting launching ramps to light cruisers was again mooted. Two of Caroline’s sister C-class cruisers, HMS Caledon and HMS Cassandra, were among the first vessels so fitted. These ramps were built on the foredeck, and extended from the bridge structure out over the bow gun in such a way that its movement was not impaired. They added little weight to the ship, so the Commander-in-Chief ordered that one ship in each of the light cruiser squadrons should be so fitted. Caroline, of the 4th Light Cruiser Squadron, had her platform fitted in 1917-18, to carry a Sopwith 2F.1 ‘Camel’ single-seat scout aircraft.


HMS Caroline’s flying-off platform with Sopwith Camel (NMRN)

Although much smaller than capital ships such as battleships and battle cruisers, light cruisers had the advantage of speed and manoeuvrability. The C-class, with their powerful steam-turbine machinery, could reach speeds approaching 30 knots, meaning that an aircraft would need very little take-off roll to become airborne.
Caroline’s Camel was never called upon to launch in anger. However, the potential of the arrangement could be seen in the flight by Flight Sub Lieutenant B.A. Smart on 21 August 1917. Smart was the pilot of a Sopwith Pup carried by HMS Yarmouth of the 3rd Light Cruiser Squadron. At 0530, a zeppelin was spotted, this being L23, a ‘Q-class’ airship, veteran of 51 reconnaissance missions and three bombing raids. Yarmouth turned into wind and Smart used the Pup’s excellent climbing capability to put his aircraft above the zeppelin, and was able to take advantage of the lightly loaded biplane’s manoeuvrability to keep himself out of the defensive machine guns’ fields of fire. Making his final attack from around 100 yards, Smart saw incendiary bullets enter the airship’s stern, and L23 quickly caught fire and crashed.

Caroline’s experience with the flying-off platform was less dramatic. It seems that a number of flights were made from her, as no fewer than eight Camels are logged as having been aboard (compared with just one or two in some cases) . Several sources report that the Caroline’s ramp was used for experiments with flying off aircraft, and this may have been the case, although some 22 light cruisers were fitted with platforms during this period.

An unconfirmed legend (see this post on the Great War forum) has it that Captain H.R. Crook, in command from 1916 until the end of the war, was frustrated by the need to turn his ship into wind to launch the Camel, followed by the inconvenience of having to wait for aircraft and pilot to be lightered to the cruiser. The story goes that after one successful launch, the pilot flew further down the coast than anticipated, leaving the Captain with a five-hour wait to recover the Camel, whereupon he declared that the pilot could fly as far as he liked, as neither aircraft nor aircrew would be allowed back on the Caroline.

Whatever the truth of this, there were certain impracticalities to the fixed foredeck launching ramps that no doubt became apparent during this period. The ship had to be turned into wind, reducing its freedom of manoeuvre and meaning it would have to leave the line of battle. Furthermore, most cruisers lacked a crane to bring the aircraft back on board.

Flying operations of this nature came to an end in 1919 when the Sopwith 2F.1 was withdrawn from service. It seems that the Camel’s replacement, the Nieuport Nighthawk, was not considered for launching from ship platforms, although steps were taken to modify Sopwith Snipes for that use. The RN had to wait until the introduction of the Fairey Flycatcher in 1924 for this kind of flying to be resumed.

By this time, wartime experience had led to developments in the platforms used for launching aircraft. A revolving platform was specially designed and wind-tunnel tested using models of a C-class cruiser, enabling aircraft to launch into the wind without the ship having to change course. Capital ships were able to use gun-turrets as turntables, and platforms were erected on top of the barbettes.

These developments were rendered obsolete relatively quickly, by the introduction of catapults. Nevertheless, the use of aircraft launched directly from warships for reconnaissance or defence, without needing a specialised ship, was successfully proven by Caroline and her sisters.


History

Much of HMS Caroline has undergone extensive restoration to her 1916 appearance at the Battle of Jutland. Visitors will discover a range of historic spaces including the Captain’s Cabin, Royal Marines Mess and Seamen’s Wash as well as the very important engine room, sick-bay and galley kitchen. Visitors can explore the importance of the Battle of Jutland and discover what life at sea was like for over three hundred crew who served on board Caroline during 1916.

Caroline almost didn’t take part in the Battle of Jutland as her steering gear failed as the fleet left Scapa Flow on the evening of May 30th, 1916.

Her role in the Battle of Jutland was as part of a screening force intended to find the enemy fleet and report back on them, whilst protecting the Grand Fleet from attack.

Jutland was the only engagement in which she made contact with an enemy unit. Caroline opened fire at 7:30pm on 31st May 1916 at a range of 9,200 yards, firing three 6 inch and nine 4 inch rounds. She later fired two torpedoes which went towards the German dreadnought Nassau. She then retreated under fire and eventually returned to Scapa Flow on June 2nd.

Today, Caroline is the only ship that fought at Jutland to have survived.

  • One of 8 C-class light cruisers ordered under the Admiralty’s 1913/14 construction programme
  • Work on Caroline began on 28 th January 1914 at Cammell Lairds shipyard, Birkenhead
  • She was launched on 21 st September 1914, and commissioned on 4 th December that year
  • During her career, Caroline protected trade by undertaking regular North Sea patrols in WW1 and, later on, convoy screening
  • She almost didn’t take part in the Battle of Jutland as her steering gear failed as the fleet left Scapa Flow on the evening of May 30 th , 1916.
  • Her role in the Battle of Jutland was as part of a screening force intended to find the enemy fleet and report back on them, whilst protecting the Grand Fleet from attack.
  • Jutland was the only engagement in which she made contact with an enemy unit. Caroline opened fire at 7:30pm on 31 st May 1916 at a range of 9200 yards, firing three 6 inch and nine 4 inch rounds. She later fired two torpedoes which went towards the German dreadnought Nassau. She then retreated under fire and eventually returned to Scapa Flow on June 2 nd
  • Today, Caroline is the only ship that fought at Jutland to have survived.
  • After the Battle, she spent the remainder of the War patrolling, exercising, experimenting with minesweeping equipment and aircraft. She had a flying off platform built on her forecastle which enabled a Sopwith Camel to take off, but not to land.
  • In February 1917 she underwent a refit and armament change
  • She was in dry dock again when the Armistice was signed in November 1918.
  • In June 1919 she was recommissioned for the East Indies station and spent the next 2 years “Flying the Flag” in the Indian Ocean, visiting Empire territories.
  • In 1921 Caroline paid off and recommissioned, but in mid 1921 it was decided that she would return home and be placed in reserve.
  • In November 1921 she was called back, but this time the Admiralty planned for her disposal.
  • On January 19 th 1922, Caroline arrived at Portsmouth where she remained for 2 years awaiting disposal
  • Her fate changed when Sir James Craig, Prime Minister of Northern Ireland formed an RNVR division in Ulster and the Admiralty agreed that Caroline could be used as their base.
  • She was towed to Belfast in February 1924, where she was converted by Harland and Wolff into a drill ship
  • At the outbreak of WW2 in 1939, Caroline’s reservists had been drafted and Ulster RNVR ceased to exist. Caroline became a base for trawlers and other light craft, providing signal and cypher facilities. Belfast became an important centre in the Battle of the Atlantic, so many service personnel were assigned to Caroline.
  • In April 1946 Caroline was returned to Ulster Division RNVR
  • In the early 1950s she underwent a programme of modernisation

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UP ON DECK

While inside the ship is a maze of rooms and displays, up here is where you really get an idea of the ship's size and take in the sights of Belfast's surrounding docklands.

Check out those pics of the ship in use! For around two years Caroline had a short take-off deck for Royal Air Force planes.

Hopefully the pics give you a flavour of what to expect. For full visitor information, check out the official HMS Caroline Experience website.


The living legend which is a lone survivor of the Battle of Jutland will become a major public museum in Belfast

HMS Caroline, the only survivor of the Battle of Jutland, World War I’s largest naval battle, is to be reinvented as a major Northern Irish museum in a reward for a lengthy campaign by supporters to reinvigorate the vast warship.

Looming over Belfast Harbour for the past 90 years, the ship which began as a Greyhound of the Seas will benefit from £11.5 million in Heritage Lottery funding. Its overhaul is expected to be completed in time for the centenary of the battle, on May 31 2016.

“This is the culmination of 18 months to two years of extremely hard work,” said Captain John Rees, of the National Museum of the Royal Navy, who is Chair of the HMS Caroline Project Board.

“To know now that we can carry on – literally full-steam ahead with the conservation and interpretation of Caroline – is wonderful news.

“We are branding HMS Caroline as ‘A Lone Survivor, A Living Legend’. She is a jewel in the Titanic Quarter crown and adds enormous value to the unique visitor offer alongside Titanic Belfast, SS Nomadic, Pump House and the Thompson Dock.”

Captain Rees said the team would face a race against time to tell the full story of a ship originally noted for its rapid intelligence gathering.

Caroline became a drill ship for the Royal Naval Reserve after arriving in Belfast, serving as a command centre during World War II.

Her original compasses and telegraphs, engine rooms and quartet of turbines, living quarters used by servicemen a century ago and drill hall will be among the highlights for visitors, as well as substantially improved access facilities.

“You can already see that we’re working on the ship to ensure that the materiality of the vessel doesn’t degrade any further,” said Rees, calling the Fund’s support “simply first-rate”.

“I am thrilled that the funding is now in place and that we can now get on and deliver a world-class attraction.

“The money will now allow us to do a major conservation programme on the entirety of the ship. We’ll have the resources to actually interpret her and tell 100 years’ worth of naval history.

“The importance of Caroline is that of all the 250 ships that fought in the Battle of Jutland, you’re standing on the only survivor.

“She is truly an iconic vessel and the fact that she’s been in Northern Ireland for almost 100 years really allows the people of Ireland, ultimately, to really enjoy her.”


Possible redundancies

Dominic Tweddle, NMRN director general, said it was "a desperate situation".

He added that the body had liaised exhaustively with DfE and continue to do so in the hope it may still be reopened alongside other sites.

He said staff salaries had been supported under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme but "if we are not able to sway DfE from its current position then HMS Caroline will not reopen until 2021 and those jobs will have to be made redundant".

DfE, however said visitor numbers "have been disappointing to date resulting in operational deficits" at the attraction.

"The department was first informed of operational deficits in October 2018 and NMRN has still been unable to verify the totality of these," the department said.

"This was unexpected as the original business plan indicated no deficits would occur on the project until 2022/23."

The department said it has engaged external consultants to establish and confirm the totality of this deficit, with a report expected in August.

"However, to help with cash-flow issues during the Covid-19 crisis, the department has already made a substantial interim payment to NMRN," it added.

"The agreement that the department had with NMRN to operate the attraction expired on 30 June, 2020. The NMRN took the decision not to renew this agreement without a revised funding model being put in place and they notified the department of this on 10 June 2020.

"This did not leave sufficient time for the department to formulate a new funding model, redraft a new operating agreement or to procure a new operator of the attraction."

The department said it agreed with NMRN to extend the current period of closure to 31 December 2020, and will use the period to examine all options.

"The department has also advised NMRN that it will meet agreed costs associated with this period of temporary closure, which include salary costs of two members of staff who will be maintaining and overseeing the ship during this time. The remainder of the HMSC staff are currently on furlough through the Job Retention Scheme," it added.

Ulster Unionist leader Steve Aiken, who is a former Royal Navy submariner and captain, started his career on HMS Caroline in 1978 when he was 16.

He said the situation was "scandalous" adding that he did not believe it was a funding issue.

"The department is pushing to get our tourism up and running, so why this? There is something that just doesn't connect up here," he told BBC Talkback.


HMS Caroline - History

Royal Navy Log Books of the World War 1 Era

HMS CAROLINE &ndash June 1919 to February 1922, East Indies Station (4th Light Cruiser Squadron)

Edited by Keith Ball, Old Weather Transcriber, Somerset, UK

HMS Caroline (CyberHeritage/Terry Phillips, click images to enlarge)

Light Cruiser, Caroline-class

Ordered 7/8.13, Pendant Nos 87 (1914), 30 (1.18), 44 (4.18). Launched 29.9.14 Cammell Laird. 3,750 tons, 446(oa), 420(pp)x41x14ft. Turbine 40000shp, 29kts. Armament: 2-6in, 8-4in (4-6in in 1918), 8-21in tt. Armour: 3in sides, 1in deck. Crew: 301. Grand Fleet 1915-18. Battle Honour (and link to despatches, casualties, awards) Jutland 31 May 1916. RNVR drill ship 4.24, still extant. (British Warships 1914-1919)

Built by Cammell Laird, laid 28/1/14, launched 29/9/14, completed 12/14, HS 1924, extant 1984. Joined 4th Destroyer Flotilla, Grand Fleet as leader in December 1914, then joined 1st LCS from February to November 1915. Joined 4th LCS early in 1916 and fought at Jutland 31 May 1916 served with 4th LCS until after the Armistice, and went with squadron to East Indies in June 1919. Paid off into Dockyard control February 1922 and in February 1924 became Harbour TS for Ulster Division RNVR at Belfast. Served as administrative centre for escorts based at Londonderry 1939-45 and returned to RNVR. Refitted by Harland & Wolff 1951 and still in existence (1984). (Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1906-21)

British Isles Bases - Selected Charts

British Naval Bases Worldwide - Selected Charts

1. Latitude/longitude, including for days in port, show representative decimal positions for each day, as calculated by the Old Weather project's analysis program. As such, they differ by varying amounts from the positions recorded, usually at noon, in the log pages. In addition, some latitudes/longitudes have been amended in edited logs for errors in the logs, for errors in identifying locations by the analysis program, or simply for greater accuracy. In all cases, refer to the log-page scans for the positions as originally recorded. Not all log pages contain this information and the ships' positions have therefore often been estimated.

2. Full account of any day is available by clicking on the link above that day. Groups of links refer to log book covers and introductory information some may be blank.

My notes appear in square brackets, [thus].

Most days contain routine entries such as rounds correct, usual routine completed, lit fires in steam cutter, hands training, cleaning or painting and details of daily leave etc. I have omitted most of these, but occasionally transcribed every entry of a page to show the normal routine missed from the edited text.

I have not transcribed anchor bearings, or most of the sightings & bearings to landmarks, except where they help to provide details of routes & positions not provided by the noon locations.

For some days, HMS CAROLINE&rsquos log keeper gives no position. In those cases I have estimated the position, using the description, courses & speeds in the log, where possible. Where this is the case I have added [Est] after the position. With acknowledgement to Google Earth.

Thanks to the moderators and crew of Naval-History.Net & oldWeather.org for help in deciphering & understanding the logs & for presenting the edited document & especially to Maikel for the Journey Plotter.

Abbreviations:
AB: Able Seaman
A/c: Altered Course
C: Cape
CPO: Chief Petty Officer
ER: Engine Room
fms or fthms: Fathoms
no: Number
LS: Leading Seaman
LV: Light vessel
OOD: Officer of the day
OOG: Officer of Guard
PO: Petty Officer
QF: Quick Firing
RC: Roman Catholic
RIM: Royal Indian Marine
RMLI: Royal Marine Light Infantry
RMS: Royal Mail Steamer
RNR: Royal Naval Reserve
RNVR: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve
SBC: Signal Books Correct
SL: Steam Launch
SNO: Senior Naval Officer
SS: Steam ship or Screw steamer
TBD: Torpedo Boat Destroyer
WO: Warrant Officer
WT: Wireless Telegraph

THE VOYAGES OF HMS CAROLINE 1919-1922
(More detailed plots follow in the text)

(Maps prepared using Journey Plotter, developed by Maikel. The Plots can only be approximate. They are made by joining-up positions on successive days, and sometimes positions are not given. There will therefore be occasions when the ship appears to have travelled overland)

Front page of Log. Signed by Captain WJB Law RN. Address: United Services Club, Pall Mall, London and

Navigating Officer Lieutenant Commander HMC Purdon OBE, HM Navigation School, Portsmouth

Log of HMS CAROLINE from Friday 27th of June 1919 to Wednesday 16th of June 1920

[Remainder not completed]

[Captain William Johns Beckett Law was Captain of HMS CAROLINE from 6/2/19 to 19/3/21]

[Henry Maurice Chidley Purdon was born 11/8/1888, appointed in 15/1/1904 & is mentioned in the Navy List as retiring 25/8/39]

Establishment of Ship's Company

Engine-room establishment: 105

Other non-executive ratings: 39

Maker: S & A Calderara, London. No A 2103

Height of cistern above Sea: 15 ft

Error of mercurial barometer: Unknown

Forecastle deck, 1 x 6" BL Mk XII PVII* mounting on centre line

Amidships Superstructure: Ditto

After Superstructure: Ditto

Forecastle Deck: 2 x 3" HA [high angle] on Mk IVa mountings

After superstructure & motor boat: 1 x Maxim on ship&rsquos holding down ring

Upper deck, starboard side: 2 x 3 pounder saluting guns on Mk II recoil mountings

Upper deck, port side: Ditto

Two starboard tubes & two port tubes

21" AW, DR tubes, Mark II fitted with EP firing gear

Chadburn Torpedo Control [Chadburn's Torpedo control was a British Mechanical device for transmitting torpedo orders]

One cutter, 32 ft, 12 oared

Two Montague whalers, 27 ft

5.0am: Ship commissioned by Captain WJB Law, Royal Navy, for service on the East Indies Station the balance of crew having joined ship from RN Barracks, Portsmouth on the previous evening at 9.15pm

9.0am: Hands employed cleaning ship, drawing stores from dockyard & as requisite

12.5pm: Ammunition lighter secured alongside

1.30pm: Hands employed embarking ammunition as requisite

5.40pm: Watch employed embarking provisions

6.10pm: Slipped from jetty & proceeded as requisite in charge of pilot

6.45pm: Secured to A mooring buoy

6.45am: Hands employed embarking ammunition & as requisite

12.30pm: Leave to boys from 1.30pm &lsquotil 6pm

5.110 pm: Discharged one ordinary seaman to RN barracks, Portsmouth

7.45pm: Fouled mooring buoy & lighter, but eventually swung clear

10.0pm: Two ratings joined ship from RN barracks, Portsmouth

11.5pm: Tug secured alongside

7.25am: Slipped & proceeded as requisite down Pembroke Dock

8.05am: Secured to Wear buoy

9.0am: Hands employed preparing ship for sea

1.15pm: Tug secured astern, swung ship for adjustment of compass

3.10pm: Finished swinging, tug cast off

7.55pm: Slipped from Wear buoy

8.0pm: Proceeded out of harbour, courses as requisite, worked up to 15 knots = 280 revs approx

8.41pm: Mid channel Rock buoy abeam to port, 3 cables

11.15pm: Exercised sea boat&rsquos crew

3.18am: Seven Stones light vessel abeam, to starboard, 2.5 miles

4.45am: A/c to starboard to avoid trawler, proceeded to westward of fishing fleet

7.0pm: Spliced the main brace by order of Captain Law RN in honour of the signing of the Peace Treaty

11.30pm: Exercised close watertight doors

4.0pm: Exercised collision stations

4.25pm: Passed SS POLAMO steering NE [Possibly the Munson line steamer SS PALOMA, previously the SS ARDRANOSE, launched in 1894]

2.20am: Burlings Island light abeam, to port, 23.5 miles [Presumably Berlengas Island]

4.55am: Cape Roca light abeam, to port, 12.7 miles

1.25pm: Cape St Vincent abeam to port, 7 miles

10.35pm: Sighted Cape Trafalgar, E

1.10pm: Paid monthly advance, hands make & mend clothes

4.19pm: Dropped both life buoys, exercised away sea boats crews

4.15pm: Watch spreading awnings

7.59pm: Sighted Cape Bougarone

10.20pm: Adjusted telemotor steering gear

7.30am: Passed HMS BAGSHOT [HMS BAGSHOT was an Aberdare class minesweeper, launched in 1918, 1 x 4&rdquo gun]

9.0am: Adjusted telemotor gear

7.44pm: Pantelleria abeam to starboard

Pembroke Dock to Malta [Grand Harbour, Valletta]

5.0am: Course as requisite for Grand Harbour

6.45am: Secured to no 4 buoy & stern to Club House Jetty

12.30pm: Leave to watch from 1.30pm to 7am, leave to boys from 1.30pm to 6pm

1.0pm: Hands employed embarking provisions, 3 pounder saluting guns (4 in number) & as requisite

11.45am: Slipped & proceeded, course & speed as requisite for leaving harbour

1.0pm: Commenced running steam trials (for revolutions) over measured mile

3.55pm: Adjusted telemotor gear

4.12pm: Passed HMS DRUID bound west [HMS DRUID was an Acheron class destroyer launched in 1911, 2 x 4&rdquo guns]

9.50am: Adjusted telemotor gear

11.15am: Lost overboard by accident, lines log (65 fthms), patt 316A (one in no), governors, patt 315A, (one in no), rotators, patt 315C (one in no)

11.15pm: Adjusted telemotor gear

2.0am: Spoke to SS DATICA bound to Lisbon

3.30am: Cape Brulos light abeam to starboard

3.40am: Adjusted telemotor gear

6.50am: Damietta North light house, south

11.30am: Anchored, secured to buoys bow & stern, also warps to shore

4.45pm: Read warrant no 1, discharged one prisoner to HMS HANNIBAL [HMS HANNIBAL was a Majestic class pre-dreadnought battleship, launched in 1896, 4 x 12&rdquo guns]

THE VOYAGES OF HMS CAROLINE
Operations on East Indies Station

Lat 30.9, Long 32.3 [Est]

5.0am: Hands preparing ship for sea

5.30am: Slipped & proceeded in charge of pilot, as requisite alongside oiler

6.45am: Secured alongside SANTA MARGARITA, oiling ship

9.20am: Finished oiling, slipped & proceeded in charge of pilot as requisite through the Suez Canal

3.30pm: Arrived off Ismailia, stopped & exchanged pilots

4.20pm: Passed SS SICILIA [Probably the SS SICILIA, launched in 1898]

4.48pm: Entered Great Bitter Lake

5.50pm: Entered Little Bitter Lake

8.40pm: Stopped & dropped pilot, Newport Rock abeam to port

10.55pm: Sighted Zafarana light

12.25am: Zafarana light abeam

3.45am: Ras Gharib light abeam

7.15am: Passed Danish Motor Vessel TONGKING [SS TONKING was a Danish motor vessel, launched in 1914]

2.10pm: Brothers light house abeam, to port, 3.8 miles

8.13pm: Daedalus light abeam

3.30am: Respread f'xle & quarter deck awnings

11.30pm: Sighted Jebel Teir light

1.40am: Jebel Teir light abeam, 6.75 miles

2.55am: Spoke to SS BRITISH ENSIGN, bound Suez [SS BRITISH ENSIGN was a Tyne built tanker launched in 1917]

4.50pm: Sighted Perim Island, ESE

5.45pm: Engines to slow, communicated with Perim

9.30am: Anchored in Berbera Harbour

12.0N: Dressed ship overall, rainbow fashion & fired salute of 101 guns to celebrate peace

10.35pm: Weighed & proceeded

9.30am: Course & speed as requisite for entering & securing stern to buoy in Aden Harbour

11.35am: Weighed starboard anchor, two tugs in attendance

12.30pm: Anchored & secured stern to no 5 buoy

4.20am: Galley became unhooked and drifted to leeward. Called away galley's crew & night boat's crew

5.35am: Sent galley's crew away in first whaler, galley recovered

9.50am: 22 seedie boys joined ship

11.30am: Hoisted boats on account of weather

5.45pm: Water tank secured alongside

11.30am: Unshackled after buoy wire

5.20pm: Weighed anchor & proceeded as requisite

6.20pm: Secured alongside oil tank, QUARTO, port anchor down, oil ship

Aden to Bombay [Mumbai]

12.0M: Slipped from oiler QUARTO

12.10am: Weighed port anchor & proceeded as requisite out of harbour

12.30am: Went full speed astern to avoid SS SHATSAN coming into harbour on wrong side of channel

1.26am: Ras Marshaq light abeam, 3.9 miles

1.15pm: Increase to 15 knots, 290 revs or 360 revs on cruising turbine

8.30pm: Lost overboard by accident, scrubbers, paintwork, two in no, knives, four in no, basins, six in no, lids, tea urn, one in no

4.5am: Quarter deck awning split by wear, furled quarter deck awning

6.45am: Furled starboard waist awning

2.0pm: Lost overboard by accident, covers for deflection teacher, one in no

5.15pm: Evening quarters, furled f'xle awnings

4.0pm: Mercurial barometer found broken at 4pm

12.40pm: Sighted Bombay floating light

1.0pm: Course & speed as requisite for entering harbour

2.5pm: Secured to North transport buoy

4.0pm: Lost overboard by accident, sinker, 28lbs, patt 1310, one in no, guide brace, patt 1266, one in no, swivels, patt 1311, one in no, steel wire rope, patt 1308, 300 fms, one coil

1.40pm: Discharged four ratings to signal station

4.0pm: Leave to part of watch from 6.30pm till 7.0am

[All entries transcribed as example of routine in port]

5.30am: Hands employed cleaning ship

9.10am: Divisions, Read Prayers

10.25am: Hands employed as requisite

2.15pm: Hands employed as requisite

4.0pm: Evening quarters, SBC, leave to one watch from 5pm till 7am

1.0pm: Leave to boys from 1pm to 6pm

9.0am: All boats away under sail

6.30am: Slipped & proceeded as requisite for anchorage off Butchers Island

7.30am: Ammunition lighter secured alongside

8.30am: Hands employed disembarking ammunition

11.10am: Weighed & proceeded as requisite

11.50am: Secured in docking bays in Royal Indian Marine dockyard

12.15pm: Slipped from buoys, proceeded into wet basin in charge of dockyard officials

4.0pm: Ship&rsquos company proceeded to sailors&rsquo home

8.4am: Hands returned on board, employed preparing for sea

11.45am: Passed through entrance in charge of dockyard officials

12.25pm: Proceeded, course & speed as requisite for anchorage

8.0am: Weighed & proceeded in charge of pilot into Prince's Dock

12.15pm: Secured in K berth, Prince's Dock

11.0am: Slipped from K berth & proceeded out of Prince's Dock, pilot in charge

12.0N: Passed through entrance & proceeded, course & speed as requisite

12.45pm: Secured to N transport buoy

9.10am: Mr Halifax, warrant shipwright, joined ship

2.22pm: Slipped & proceeded to RIM Dockyard

2.45pm: Secured to docking buoys

2.56am: Slipped & warped to the entrance

3.30pm: Secured alongside in wet basin

8.20am: Hands arrived on board, employed refitting & as requisite

5.15pm: Fire stations correct

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed refitting & as requisite

5.30pm: Fire stations correct

8.15am: Hands arrived on board

9.30am: Hands employed scraping ship&rsquos side

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed scraping ship&rsquos side, refitting & as requisite

10.15am: Divisions, at sailors&rsquo home

10.30am: Divine service, at sailors&rsquo home

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, hands employed scraping ship&rsquos side, refitting & as requisite

11.0am: Seamanship & gunnery training classes under instruction

12.45am: Hands left ship, lost overboard by accident, brushes, paint, patt 5/0, one in number

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed scraping ship&rsquos side, refitting & as requisite

11.0am: Training classes under instruction

10.15am: Divisions at sailors&rsquo home

5.30pm: Fire stations correct

LOGS FOR SEPTEMBER 1919

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed painting boats, refitting & as requisite

10.0am: Training classes under instruction

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed painting out boats, refitting & as requisite

10.0am: Training classes under instruction

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed scraping ship&rsquos side as requisite

11.0am: Training classes at instruction

5.30pm: Fire stations correct

10.15am: Divisions at sailors&rsquo home

10.45am: Church at sailors&rsquo home

10.15am: Divisions at sailors&rsquo home

10.45am: Divine service at sailors&rsquo home

6.30am: Company drill in dockyard

10.15am: Divisions at sailors' home

10.45pm: Church at sailors' home

6.0am: Company drills in dockyard

9.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed refitting, scraping & as requisite

11.0am: Training classes at instruction

5.30am: Fire stations correct

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed refitting, scraping & as requisite

10.30am: Training classes at instruction, lost overboard by accident one hand lead

11.30am: Hands mustered for soap and tobacco

10.15am: Divisions at sailors' home

10.45am: Divine service at sailors' home

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed scraping, painting & refitting

11.0am: Training classes at instruction, paid monthly money

5.30pm: Part of ship's company proceeded to Deolali camp [Deolali was an army transit camp in India, used as a sailors' home. It is the source of the phrase "gone doolally" meaning to lose one's mind]

LOGS FOR OCTOBER 1919

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed scraping, painting & as requisite

11.0am: Torpedo training class at Instruction

5.30pm: Fire stations correct

7.0am: Ship warped out of wet dock

8.30am: Secured to N transport buoy

10.40am: HMS COLOMBO secured to buoy & alongside ship [HMS COLOMBO was a Carlisle class light cruiser launched in 1918, 5 x 6" guns]

5.0pm: Leave to starboard watch from 5pm to 7am

7.0am: Hands employed cleaning up deck

9.30am: Hands preparing hawsers for securing alongside jetty

1.30pm: Seven ratings left ship to join HMS COLOMBO for passage, three ratings joined ship from HMS COLOMBO

5.0pm: Leave to port watch from 5pm till 7am, RIMS LAWRENCE & INVESTIGATOR sailed [RIMS LAWRENCE was probably the RIM troopship launched in 1896, 4 x 4" guns] [RIMS INVESTIGATOR was an Indian Marine survey vessel launched in 1906]

7.0am: Tugs secured alongside, slipped buoy & proceeded into Prince's Dock

9.10am: Secured alongside Prince's Dock

12.0pm: Started pumping out oil

1.0pm: Leave to starboard watch from 1.30pm till midnight

6.20am: Warped and towed out of Prince's Dock

8.10am: Anchored in harbour to await tide

9.0am: Weighed & proceeded in charge of tugs to RIM wet basin

10.20am: Secured alongside North wall

10.15am: Divisions at sailors' home

10.45am: Divine service at sailors' home

10.15am: Divisions at sailors' home

10.45am: Divine service at sailors' home

5.30pm: Fire stations correct

10.15am: Divisions at sailors' home

10.45am: Divine service at sailors' home

LOGS FOR NOVEMBER 1919

10.15am: Divisions at sailors' home

10.45am: Divine service at sailors' home

5.0pm: Fire stations correct

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed refitting, scraping & painting

11.40am: Hands mustered for monthly payment

5.30pm: Fire stations correct, sloped awnings

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed refitting, painting & scraping & as requisite

10.58am: Two minutes&rsquo silence to celebrate Armistice Day

5.30pm: Fire stations correct

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed painting ship's side, mess deck & refitting as requisite

5.30pm: Fire stations correct

7.0am: Hands arrived on board

8.20am: Hands arrived on board, employed painting side & mess decks, scraping & refitting as requisite

2.30pm: Commenced basin trial

3.50pm: Finished basin trial

5.30pm: Fire stations correct

10.15am: Divisions at sailors' home

10.45pm: Divine service at sailors' home

7.40am: Stokers arrived on board

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed painting side & mess deck, scraping & refitting as requisite

5.30pm: Fire stations correct

7.40am: Stokers arrived on board

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed painting, scraping & red leading & as requisite

5.30pm: Fire stations correct

7.40am: Stokers arrived on board

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed scraping, red leading, painting & refitting as requisite

5.30pm: Fire stations correct

8.15am: Hands arrived on board, employed scraping, red leading & painting & refitting as requisite

10.40am: Entered Duncan Dry Dock

5.30pm: Fire stations correct

7.0am: Party returned from Deolali camp

7.40am: Stokers arrived on board

10.30am: Divisions at sailors' home

11.0am: Divine service at sailors' home

7.45am: Hands arrived on board

8.0am: Hands employed scraping, red leading, painting, drawing stores from dockyard, refitting & as requisite

5.30pm: Fire stations correct

7.40am: Hands arrived on board, employed preparing hawsers for leaving dock, drawing stores & as requisite

10.50am: Hands proceeded to sailors' home to bring bags & hammocks back on board ship

1.0pm: Hands returned on board

3.0pm: Warped out of dock, towed by two tugs to N Transport buoy

7.30pm: Provision lighter secured astern

5.45am: Hands employed provisioning ship from lighter

9.25am: Hands employed stowing provisions & as requisite

1.0pm: Slipped & proceeded as requisite for Prince's Dock

2.0pm: Entered Prince's Dock

2.55pm: Secured in K berth Prince's Dock

3.0pm: Hands employed stowing provisions

5.0pm: Leave to watch & part from 5pm till 7am, landed patrol

5.15am: Hands employed red leading & painting

2.10pm: Slipped from berth (two tugs)

2.30pm: Passed out through lock gate, course & speed as requisite

3.0pm: Secured to N Transport buoy

5.0pm: Leave to watch from 5pm till 7am, landed patrol

LOGS FOR DECEMBER 1919

5.45am: Ammunition lighter secured alongside, hands employed embarking ammunition

8.0am: Dressed ship rainbow fashion in honour of HM The Queen Mother's birthday

6.0am: Hands employed as requisite

8.25am: Hands employed cleaning ship as requisite & painting ship

12.50pm: Hands mustered by the open list for monthly payment

2.0pm: Hands employed as requisite & painting ship

4.0pm: Read warrants no 10 & 11

4.30pm: Leave to watch from 5.45pm till 7am

5.45am: Hands employed striking down ammunition & scrubbing decks

4.45pm: Discharged one rating to hospital, Colaba

5.0pm: Leave to watch till 10pm, landed patrol, one CERA rejoined ship from hospital Deolali

THE VOYAGES OF HMS CAROLINE
Operations off India

7.40am: Slipped & proceeded out of harbour

8.9am: Prongs light house abeam

9.23am: Kundari Island light house abeam, 8.8miles

4.20pm: Boria Pagoda abeam, to port

8.20pm: Wagapur light abeam to port

11.47pm: Burnt Island light on port beam, 4 miles

2.7am: Aguada light on port beam, 11.2 miles

9.40am: Pigeon Rock on port beam, 6.5 miles

3.53pm: Mangalore [Mangaluru] Church abeam to port

8.25pm: Mount Dilli abeam to port

9.35pm: Kannanore [Kannur] light abeam, to port

10.22am: Alleppi light house on port beam, 5¾ miles

6.33pm: Muttum light abeam to port

10.30pm: Passed HMS HIGHFLYER to port, proceeding to Bombay [HMS HIGHFLYER was a Hyacinth Class protected cruiser launched in 1898, 11 x 6" guns]

1.45am: Spoke SS FALLI, bound UK [Possibly misspelled SS FALKE, of which two possible are listed on Ships List]

6.50am: Pilot came on board

7.20am: Anchored, secured bow & stern to buoys

8.0am: Oiler secured alongside

10.40am: Lieutenant Commander Gordon, DSO rejoined ship from convalescent home

6.15pm: Slipped bow & stern wires

6.20pm: Weighed & proceeded out of harbour

9.12pm: Barberyn light abeam to port, 6.4miles

12.0pm: Sighted Pointe de Galle light abeam, 11½ miles

1.4am: Pointe de Galle light on port beam, 9.1 miles

5.06am: Dondra Head light abeam to port

9.43am: Great Basses light abeam to port

11.35am: Little Basses light abeam to port, 5.4 miles

12.30am: A/c N15 W & increased to 230 revs to go to assistance of SS ULA [SS ULA was a British India Steam Navigation steamer, launched in 1894]

7.30am: A/c, reduced to 215 revs, SS ULA safe

9.25am: Adjusted telemotor steering gear

2.0pm: Hands employed painting ship, holystoning decks & as requisite

4.0am: Course as requisite waiting for daylight to pick up pilot

6.20am: Pilot came on board

6.45am: Proceeded, pilot in charge

9.30am: Hands employed preparing ship for mooring at Calcutta, cleaning ship & as requisite

2.03pm: Stopped engines, harbour master came on board & took charge

4.14pm: Secured bow & stern to buoys with chain cable

1.0pm: Leave to watch from 2pm till 7am, leave to boys till 6pm, hands make & mend clothes

10.45am: C of E party returned on board

1.0pm: Leave to watch from 1:30 pm till 7am, leave to boys till 6pm

8.30am: Landed escort of one corporal & three privates RMLI

11.30am: Escort returned with three prisoners

11.25am: Escort returned with prisoner

1.0pm: Hands to make & mend clothes, leave to watch from 1pm till 7am, boys till 6pm

1.5pm: HE, The Governor of Bengal came on board

2.25pm: HE left ship, fired salute of 17 guns

9.10am: Divisions, read prayers

4.0pm: Leave to watch from 5pm till 7am

11.15am: Discharged two ratings to hospital

9.15am: Landed C of E party

1.20pm: HE, The Viceroy of India came on board

3.10pm: HE, The Viceroy of India left ship

4.0pm: Quarters, leave to watch from 5pm to 7am

9.20am: Landed church parties

12.0N: Captain's & officers&rsquo rounds

8.15am: Water tank secured alongside

9.10am: Divisions, read prayers

9.20am: Water tank cast off

8:50am: Hands employed preparing ship for sea & as requisite

12.0N: Hands employed working about cables

2:10pm: Warped ship to outer buoy

2.25pm: Slipped & proceeded as requisite down river

2:40pm: Harbour master left ship, pilot took charge, speed 15 knots, course as requisite

5:45pm: Course & speed as requisite for anchoring in Diamond Harbour

11.30am: Weighed & proceeded down river, pilot in charge

1.0pm: Course as requisite down River Hugli [Hooghly], speed 13 knots

4:32pm: Intermediate light vessel abeam to port

6:0pm: Stopped, pilot gave up charge & left ship

6:20pm: Eastern Channel light vessel abeam to port

6:25pm: Streamed patent log

Diamond Harbour to Chittagong

10.34am: South Patches light vessel abeam to port

12.25pm: Kutubdia Lighthouse abeam to starboard

1:30pm: Engines as requisite, waiting for pilot

2:15pm: Harbour master came on board

8.30pm to 9.0pm: Burnt searchlights

10.15am: Commissioner of Chittagong came on board

1.0pm: Port watch make & mend clothes

2.15pm: Starboard watch employed cleaning ship & as requisite

LOGS FOR JANUARY 1920

9.15am: Divisions, read prayers

12.0N: Fired salute of 31 guns

12.40pm: Paid quarterly settlement

4.15pm: Weighed, lost overboard by accident, brooms, hair soft, one in number

5.55pm: Kutubdia light abeam

Lat 20.1, Long 92.9 [Akyab is now known as Sittwe, Myanmar]

3.46am: Oyster Island light abeam to port, 12 miles

6.50am: Stopped to pick up Harbour Master

2.30pm: Discharged one rating to hospital, leave to port watch from 3.30pm till 7pm

5.0pm: Put clocks on 30 minutes to Burmese standard time

7.30am: Landed RC church party

9.30am: Rigged church for divine service

1.0pm: Leave to chief & first class POs from 3.30pm till 7pm

6.0pm: Prepared ship for sea

Lat 19.1, Long 93.2 [Bassein is now known as Pathein, Myanmar]

6.50am: Weighed & proceeded out of harbour

8.10am: White pagoda abeam to port

5.30am: Diamond Island light bore S87E, hauled in patent log

6.0am: Engines as requisite for picking up pilot

6.40am: Proceeded, courses as requisite for Bassein River, pilot in charge

1.20pm: Fired salute of 13 guns

4.27pm: Weighed & proceeded as requisite to mooring berth

5.20am: Moored ship, stern wire to buoy & two wires to shore

12.25pm: Commissioner came on board

2.30pm: Fired salute of 13 guns, ship open to visitors

9:10am: Divisions, read prayers, hands employed as requisite

10:40am: Landing party fell in, served out leather gear & gaiters

2.0pm: Landed patrol, ship open to visitors

7.0am: Landed small arms companies

9.15am: Landing party returned on board, returned arms

3.0pm: Ship open to visitors

2.30pm: Ship open to visitors

11.35am: Weighed anchor, engines as requisite for turning ship

11.55pm: Harbour master left ship, pilot took charge

1.0pm: Course as requisite down Bassein River, speed 12 knots, pilot in charge

6.0pm: Stopped to drop pilot at Diamond Island & to clear PV chains [Paravane, a device towed alongside the ship, used to cut ropes of moored mines]

9.30am: Divisions, read prayers, exercised control parties, remainder employed as requisite

10.40am: Secured from control drill

4.0pm: Quarters, read & exercised collision stations

10.0am: Prepared PVs for running

11.30am: Reduced to 10 knots

2:15pm: Prepared for in PVs

11.35am: Sighted land ahead

1.50pm: Course & speed as requisite for entering Trincomali Harbour

2.27pm: Anchored in Trincomali harbour, ship in harbour, SY EMERALD [Possibly EMERALD, motor boat, ex-civilian pleasure craft, Motor Boat No 102]

4.15pm: Hands muster by ledger for slops

9.10am: Divisions, read prayers, starboard watch employed hoisting up torpedoes, remainder as requisite

9.30am: Exercised control parties, carried out director test

12.35pm: Oiler RAPIDOL arrived in harbour & secured alongside [RFA RAPIDOL was a Fleet Auxiliary oiler launched in 1917]

3.50pm: Oiler RAPIDOL cast off & anchored

5.15pm: Port watch employed embarking stores from oiler RAPIDOL

7.55pm: Oiler RAPIDOL sailed

8.40am: Weighed & proceeded out of harbour

9.25am: Exercised control parties

10.0am: Commenced 1" aiming rifle practice at towed target

11.40am: Weighed & proceeded into harbour

4.0pm: Leave to watch from 4pm till 6.30pm, chief & 1st class PO's till 8.30pm

6.0am: Hands employed cleaning ship, tested boats for buoyancy

10.0am: Lost by accident 1½ pints of rum

7.0am: Landed RC church party

9.30am: Hands mustered by open list

11.10am: Yacht EMERALD sailed

8.30am: Weighed & proceeded out of harbour & as requisite for firing practice

8.45am: Furled awnings. Carried out 1" aiming rifle practice at drifting target

11.10am: Finished firing, picked up target & proceeded back to harbour

5.0pm: Exercised boat sailing

8.30pm: Exercised night action stations

8.30am: Weighed & proceeded out of harbour & as requisite for firing practice

9.30am: Dropped target, carried out sub-calibre practice (3 pounder) at drifting target

10.55am: Picked up target, proceeded as requisite for carrying out two torpedo runs

12.30pm: Finished torpedo practice, course & speed as requisite for anchoring

1.15pm: Hoisted in both torpedoes

2.35pm: Weighed & proceeded into harbour

7.0am: Lost overboard by accident, buckets, wash deck, wood, one in number

9.15am: Divisions, read prayers

9.30am: Read stations for & exercised tow aft & out kedge anchor

2.15pm: Hands employed scrubbing upper deck as requisite, divers examined propellers

9.25am: Fired torpedo from port tube

10.0am: Port watch out kedge anchor, remainder as requisite

11.46am: Fired torpedo from port tube, carried out director test

5.0pm: Weighed kedge anchor

8.28am: Weighed & proceeded out of harbour & as requisite for firing

9.30am: Carried out sub-calibre practice at drifting target

10.20am: Proceeded as requisite for torpedo practice

12.3pm: Fired second torpedo

12.40pm: Hoisted in first torpedo & whaler

1.5pm: Hoisted in second torpedo & whaler

6.15pm: Exercised night action stations

7.5pm: Commenced night firing with 1" aiming rifle at towed target

7.17pm: Finished firing, proceeded into harbour

8.0am: Read warrants nos 14, 15 & 16, discharged three ratings to detention

10.0am: Lost overboard by accident, one boat's crutch

7.0am: Landed RC church party

7.35am: Landed Wesleyan church party

9.0am: Lost overboard by accident one boat's crutch

10.0am: Hands mustered by open list, issued parchment certificates

1.0pm: Leave to watch from 1.30pm till 6.30pm, chief & first class POs till 8pm, boys till 6.30pm

6.40pm: Liberty men returned

9.30am: Read stations for & exercised out bower anchor

11.15am: Exercised away all boats crews

8,40am: Weighed & proceeded out of harbour & as requisite for torpedo practice

9:20am: Lowered whalers, carried out two torpedo runs

10.20am: Hoisted whalers & proceeded as requisite for sub-calibre practice

11:45am: Finished firing, picked up target

11:55am: Proceeded as requisite for returning to harbour

8.30pm: Exercised searchlight crews

7:25am: Read warrant no 17, discharged one Private RMLI to detention

8.30am: Landed rigging party on Great Sober Island

9.10am: Divisions, read prayers, exercised physical drill

8.40am: Exercised searchlights crews

8.30am: Weighed & proceeded out of harbour as requisite for torpedo practice

9.20am: Lowered both whalers & carried out two torpedo runs

10:45am: Hoisted whalers & torpedoes

10:50am: Dropped target & carried out sub-calibre practice

11.25am: Picked up target & proceeded as requisite for anchoring

4.45pm: Exercised high angle guns crew & carried out director test

6.05pm: Weighed & proceeded as requisite for night firing (sub-calibre & star shell)

8.0pm: Course & speed as requisite for returning to harbour

2.15pm: Hands employed placing fenders on starboard side as requisite

4.45pm: HMS COMUS arrived & secured alongside starboard side, one private RMLI rejoined ship from hospital [HMS COMUS was a C-class light cruiser, sister ship of HMS CAROLINE, launched in 1914, 2 x 6" guns]

5.5pm: Commenced provisioning

7.15pm: Finished provisioning

7.0am: HMS COMUS cast off & proceeded to anchor

LOGS FOR FEBRUARY 1920

7.0am: Landed RC church party

7.35am: Landed Wesleyan church party

9.30am: Divisions, Captain's rounds

6.0am: Hands employed cleaning ship & launching pattern II target from dockyard slipway

7.0pm: Secured target astern

8.32am: Weighed & proceeded out of harbour with target in tow for 6" reduced charge firing with HMS COMUS

9.55am: HMS COMUS opened fire

10.5am: HMS COMUS finished firing

10.30am: HMS COMUS took target in tow

10.34am: Proceeded as requisite for firing

11.8am: Finished firing, course & speed as requisite for torpedo practice

12.3pm: Fired one torpedo at HMS COMUS

12.30pm: Hoisted in torpedo, proceeded as requisite back to harbour

7.0am: Discharged one rating to RNB Portsmouth

9.10am: Divisions, read prayers

9.30am: Read stations for & exercised let go second anchor & weigh by hand

2.0pm: Boats crews away sailing in sailing race with HMS COMUS, remainder employed as requisite

4.0pm: Leave to watch from 4 till 9pm

9.15am: Patrol returned on board

6.40am: Carried out director test

8.23am: HMS COMUS sailed with target in tow

8.43am: Weighed & proceeded out of harbour for firing practice with 6" guns, reduced charges

9.48am: Finished firing, closed HMS COMUS

10.15am: Took target in tow from HMS COMUS & proceeded as requisite

10.55pm: HMS COMUS opened fire, hauled in target

11.5pm: Proceeded as requisite for HMS COMUS torpedo practice

12.05pm: HMS COMUS fired two torpedoes, course & speed as requisite for returning to harbour

9.10am: Divisions, read prayers

9.20am: All seamen & marines mustered & laid out bedding for inspection

10.30am: All seamen laid out bags for inspection

8.20am: Weighed & proceeded out of harbour for full charge 6" firing, target in tow

10.02am: HMS COMUS opened fire

10.12am: HMS COMUS finished firing

10.45am: HMS COMUS closed & took over target

10.50am: Proceeded as requisite for firing

11.20am: Ceased fire, course & speed as requisite back to harbour

8.25am: Hands employed preparing ship for sea

10.20am: Weighed & proceeded out of harbour

11.0am: Foul Pt abeam to starboard 1¼ miles, hands mustered by open list for slops

2.0pm: Commenced working up to full power trial

3.0pm: Commenced 2 hours full power trial [Max speed recorded as 26.8 knots, maintained for 2 hours]

7.42pm: Little Basses abeam to starboard, 3.2 miles

9.10pm: Great Basses light abeam to starboard

11.47pm: Sighted Dondra light

1.20am: A/c to avoid steamer

8.0am: Course & speed as requisite for picking up pilot

8.18am: Pilot on board, course & speed as requisite for entering harbour

8.32am: Anchored & secured in no 2 berth

10.30am: Four ratings joined ship

1.0pm: Leave to watch from 1.30pm till 7am, boys till 6.30pm

2.15pm: Hands employed rigging side screens & as requisite

7.50pm: Sent advance party to join Naval Camp at Diyatalawa [Diyatalawa was a military town in the central highlands of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), with an RN rest camp]

9.0am: Discharged four ratings to hospital

9.10am: Rigging side screens & getting up stores and provisions for RN Camp Diyatalawa

2.0pm: Two ratings rejoined ship from hospital

2.15am: Hands employed as requisite, first party for Diyatalawa packing bags

6.30pm: Discharged one Private RMLI to SS OXFORDSHIRE for passage to England [SS OXFORDSHIRE was a Bibby line steamer launched in 1912, used as a hospital ship during the war]

7.0pm: First party for RN Camp Diyatalawa left ship

9.0am: Lieutenant Commander A Gordon DSO RN & Mr Halifax, warrant shipwright, left to join SS OXFORDSHIRE for passage to England

11.0am: Divers examining inlet valve & having monthly dip

2.30pm: Lost overboard by accident, one diving boot

6.30pm: Discharged one rating to HMS COMUS

8.45pm: Oiler RAPIDOL sailed

2.0pm: One rating rejoined ship from hospital

5.0pm: Discharged one rating to HMS COMUS

8.15pm: Three ratings left ship for RN camp Diyatalawa

8.20am: Nine seedie boys joined ship

5.10pm: Discharged three ratings to HMS COMUS for passage to Bombay

8.30pm: Sent patrol (one officer & ten men) on board troopship FRIEDERICHSRUH [HM Australian Troopship FRIEDRICHSRUH was a German liner, ceeded to Britain in 1919 & used for repatriation of Australian troops after WW1]

9.0pm: One officer & one private left ship for Diyatalawa

6.30am: Landed RC church party

7.30am: Landed Wesleyan church party

8.40am: Landed C of E party

9.10am: Hands employed painting mess deck, getting up ammunition for loading & as requisite

3.20pm: One rating rejoined ship from hospital

8.10am: Landed party in ammunition lighter, hands employed painting mess deck bottom colour & as requisite

8.30pm: Four ratings left for RN camp

1.30pm: One rating rejoined ship from hospital

2.15pm: Hands employed painting mess deck & as requisite, seamanship training class at examination

8.30pm: Six ratings left for RN camp Diyatalawa, one rating left for duty at detention centre, Kandy

6.30am: Landed RC church party

7.20am: Landed Wesleyan church party

8.30am: Landed C of E party

2.15pm: Hands employed painting cable locker flat & as requisite, seamanship class at instruction & examination

9.10am: Hands employed painting mess decks, cleaning ship, loading ammunition & as requisite

4.0pm: Leave to part of watch from 4.30pm till 7.0am

1.30pm: Leave to part of watch from 1.30pm till 7.0am, boys till 6.30pm

6.30am: Landed RC church party

7.30pm: Landed Wesleyan church party

8.30am: Landed C of E party

11.15am: Paid monthly money

6.0am: Hands working about hawsers preparing for shifting to next berth to the northward, (no 4)

8.35am: Slipped buoys, weighed anchor, shifted by tugs to no 4 berth secured bow & stern to buoys, anchored

8.30am: One rating joined ship, chief cook

4.30pm: Discharged one rating to military hospital

8.30am: First party returned from RN camp Diyatalawa

11.0am: Second party for camp to pack bags & hammocks

2.0pm: Second party for camp stowing bags & hammocks in lighter

6.15pm: Second party for camp served out with leather gear & gaiters

6.45pm: Second party for camp landed

1.0pm: Discharged one rating to hospital

9.0am: One officer & two ratings joined ship from RN camp

9.0pm: One officer & one rating left ship for RN camp

9.0am: One officer & one rating joined ship from RN camp, Diyatalawa

7.0pm: One rating left ship for RN camp, Diyatalawa

5.30am: One rating (MAA) left ship for RN camp, Diyatalawa

4.0pm: Quarters, read warrants nos 19 & 20

8.30pm: Three ratings joined ship from Kandy detention

3.0pm: Discharged one rating (seedie) to general hospital

5.0pm: One rating joined ship from hospital

6.30am: Two ratings left ship for RN Camp, Diyatalawa

8.30pm: One rating joined ship from Kandy detention

1.0pm: HMS TITANIA & five submarines entered harbour [HMS TITANIA was a wartime mercantile conversion, depot ship, launched in 1915]

8.30am: HM Submarine L2 entered harbour [HM Submarine L2 was an L1 class submarine launched in 1917]

5.0pm: One rating discharged to HMS TITANIA

7.30pm: One rating joined ship from Kandy detention

8.30am: One rating joined ship from RN camp, Diyatalawa

9.30am: One bag confidential books received from HMS TITANIA, one bag confidential books delivered to DIO Colombo

1.0pm: One bag confidential books & two letters received from DIO Colombo

7.55am: Oiler FRANCOL secured alongside [FRANCOL was a Belgol class fleet oiler, launched in 1917]

11.10am: Oiler FRANCOL cast off

6.30pm: Captain of Marines & one rating joined ship

6.30pm: One rating joined ship from HMS TITANIA

10.30pm: One candle lantern, patt 330, lost overboard by accident

9.0am: One rating joined ship from RN camp, Diyatalawa

7.0pm: Landed stores for RN camp, Diyatalawa

8.30am: One stoker rating joined ship from hospital, four ratings joined ship from RN camp, Diyatalawa

11.30am: French cruiser DESEIX [sic] entered harbour [DESAIX was a French Dupleix class armoured cruiser launched in 1901, 8 x 164mm guns]

4.30pm: One stoker rating discharged to hospital

7.30pm: One rating discharged to HMS TITANIA

10.30am: French Commodore arrived on board

11.25am: Fired 11 gun salute for French Commodore

5.0pm: HMS TITANIA & six submarines sailed for China

7.30pm: One rating joined ship from Kandy detention

8.0am: Paymaster Lieutenant Commander joined ship from RN camp, Diyatalawa

8.30pm: One rating left ship for RN camp, Diyatalawa

1.0pm: Captain of Marines & one private left ship for RN camp, Diyatalawa

4.30pm: Two ratings discharged to hospital (military)

7.30am: One rating joined ship from RN camp, Diyatalawa

5.45pm: HMS SWORDSMAN & four destroyers entered harbour [HMAS SWORDSMAN was an S class destroyer, launched in 1918, 3 x 4" guns, allocated to the Royal Australian Navy in 1920]

6.10pm: Officer of Guard boarded HMS SWORDSMAN

4.30pm: One rating joined ship from hospital

7.0pm: One rating joined ship from RN camp, Diyatalawa

12.20pm: Hands make & mend clothes

6.30pm: One rating left ship for RN camp, Diyatalawa

9.0pm: Paymaster Lieutenant Commander left ship for RN camp, Diyatalawa

8.40am: Church of England church party landed [Good Friday]

11.45am: Church parties returned on board

6.30am: One Petty Officer returned from RN camp, Diyatalawa

9.45am: Officer of Guard boarded yacht SAPPHIRE [Probably HMS SAPPHIRE II, hired yacht launched in 1912, 2 x 12 pounder guns]

8.30am: Landed C of E church party

10.15am: Divisions, read prayers

11.0am: Church parties returned on board

7.40am: Second party returned on board from RN camp, Diyatalawa

10.20am: Second party employed unloading baggage & stores from lighter

7.50am: Two ratings joined ship from RN camp, Diyatalawa

3.30pm: Two ratings joined ship from hospital

7.20pm: Paymaster Lieutenant joined ship from RN camp, Diyatalawa

11.0pm: Paymaster Lieutenant Commander joined ship from RN camp, Diyatalawa

11.0am: Three ratings joined ship from RN camp, Diyatalawa, one rating joined ship from hospital for HMAS SWORDSMAN

9.0am: Two Japanese cruisers entered harbour, HIJMS AZUMA & HIJMS TOKIWA, fired salute of 15 guns [HIJMS AZUMA was an armoured cruiser of the Imperial Japanese Navy, launched in 1899 in France. 4 x 20.3cm guns HIJMS TOKIWA was an Asama class armoured cruiser of the Imperial Japanese Navy, launched in 1899, in UK. 4 x 20.3cm guns]

9.30pm: Officer of Guard boarded HIJMS AZUMA

10.15am: Japanese Officer of Guard came on board

11.10am: Japanese Admiral came on board, fired salute of 15 guns for Japanese Admiral

1.30pm: SS AFRICA arrived in harbour with Crown Prince of Roumania [Romania] on board [Two ships of the time were called SS AFRICA it is not clear which this is]

2.30pm: Fired salute of 21 guns for Crown Prince of Roumania

7.20am: Landed Wesleyan & Presbyterian church party

8.30am: Land C of E church party

7.30am: Oiler RAPIDOL secured alongside, commenced oiling

8.40am: Seamanship classes to instructions, remainder employed embarking canteen stores ex RAPIDOL, nine hand scrubbers lost by accident, pattern 459

3.35pm: RAPIDOL cast off & proceeded to sea

3.45pm: Two ratings joined ship from military hospital

7.0am: Seedies employed painting ship's side

2.45pm: Two ratings joined ship from military hospital

9.30am: Lost overboard, hand scrubber, one, patt no 459

3.0pm: Two ratings joined ship from hospital

9.45am: Hands employed securing boats for sea & as requisite

1.30pm: One rating discharged to hospital, 21 ratings discharged to Echelon barracks to await passage to England

11.15pm: Crown Prince of Roumania with four staff officers & two servants embarked for Bombay

3.0am: Weighed & proceeded out of harbour

10.0am: Blow lamp, one, lost overboard by accident, patt no 610

8.10pm: A/c two points to starboard to avoid SS HUNTSGREEN [SS HUNTSGREEN was the German steamer DERFLINGER, launched in 1907, captured in 1914, renamed HUNTSGREEN & used as a troopship in WW1]

10.0pm: Sighted HMS HIGHFLYER on port bow

4.55am: Alleppi light house abeam, 11½ miles

9.10am: Pigeon Island abeam

11.41pm: Deogargh light abeam, 7.2 miles

12.56am: Rajapura light abeam

3.12am: Ratnagiri light abeam

3.25pm: Bombay light float abeam

4.30pm: Dressed ship overall

4.40pm: Secured to Mid Troopship buoy

4,55pm: Crown Prince of Roumania & staff disembarked, fired salute of 21 guns

6.30am: One rating joined ship from HMS HOLLYHOCK [HMS HOLLYHOCK was a Flower-Class fleet minesweeping sloop, launched in 1915, 2 x 12 pounder guns]

7.5am: Oiler RAPIDOL secured alongside, port side

10.30am: Four ratings joined ship

11.30am: Oiler RAPIDOL shoved off

1.0pm: Five ratings & two marines discharged to RN depot Bombay, one rating discharged to hospital

4.0pm: Quarters, read warrant no 22, one rating discharged to Colaba Detention, one rating joined ship

From: Information required for ships log. To Gunner (T)

Description of Torpedo Armaments in Caroline

Information required for ships log. To Armament Office

Position Nature & number of guns & mountings

Information required for ships log. To Engineers Office from Sub Lieut

6.0am: Slipped from buoy & proceeded, course & speed as requisite out of harbour

7.15am: Bombay light float, to starboard

4.50pm: Jaigargh light house, abeam

9.57pm: Fort Point light abeam, 5.2 miles

12.48am: Vengurla light, abeam, 6.3 miles

8.3am: Oyster Rock light house, abeam, 14 miles

10.15am: Dropped both PVs, starboard PV failed to run

10.25pm: Stopped to get in starboard PV

1.5pm: Pigeon Island, abeam, 8.7 miles

2.30pm: Dropped starboard PV, failed to run

2.45pm: Stopped both, in both PVs

3.20pm: Kodachadin Peak, abeam

8.15pm: Mangalore light, abeam

9.0pm: An extraordinary electric storm started, continuous lightning, no thunder, direction SSW

11.30pm: Very heavy squall from SSE, lasting over 30 minutes

2.15am: Kannanore light abeam

3.0am: Tellicherry light abeam

4.38am: Cotta Point light, abeam

1.0pm: Cochin ligh house, abeam

3.42pm: Alleppi light house, abeam

1.18am: Muttam light, abeam, 13.5 miles

10.0am: Cleared lower deck, read Articles of War

9.18pm: Point de Galle light, abeam

1.54pm: Dondra Head light, abeam, 8 miles

3.20am: Hambantota light, abeam, 9½ miles

8.0am: Little Basses light house, abeam, 4½ miles

4.53pm: Batticaloa light house, abeam, 5.8 miles

10.45pm: Anchored in Trincomali Harbour

11.0pm: One rating left ship for HMS HIGHFLYER, one officer (Carpenter), joined ship, Officer of Guard from HMS HIGHFLYER came on board

12.50pm: HMS COMUS proceeded to sea for sub-calibre firing

1.30pm: HMS HIGHFLYER proceeded to sea for sub-calibre firing

2.30pm: Weighed & proceeded out of harbour for sub-calibre firing

6.12pm: Carried out two runs 6'' sub-calibre at target towed by HMS COMUS

6.56pm: Anchored in Back Bay

9.25pm: Weighed & proceeded for night firing (sub-calibre) at moored target

9.50pm: Commenced firing, carried out three runs

11.5pm: Anchored in Back Bay, Trincomali

8.30am: Weighed & proceeded, single line ahead for torpedo practice

9.40am: Fired one torpedo, starboard side

9.55am: Stopped to pick up torpedo

10.6am: Hoisted torpedo, hoisted motor boat

10.40am: Proceeded to take target in tow

11.15am: Stopped, proceeded to weigh target moorings

11.30am: Lowered second whaler to pick up mooring buoy

12.15pm: Proceeded half speed with target in tow

12.38pm: HMS HIGHFLYER opened fire

1.20pm: HMS HIGHFLYER completed practice

1.50pm: HMS COMUS opened fire

2.20pm: HMS COMUS completed practice

2.45pm: HMS COMUS took target in tow

2.50pm: Half speed ahead both, course as requisite for firing

4.45pm: Anchored in Trincomali Harbour

8.20am: HMS HIGHFLYER proceeded out of harbour

10.35am: Weighed & proceeded as requisite for 6" full-calibre firing, (full charge)

12.3pm: Ceased fire, course & speed as requisite for anchoring in Back Bay

8.0pm: Weighed & proceeded, course & speed as requisite for 6" full-calibre, reduced charge firing, carried out two runs

9.25pm: Anchored in Back Bay

6.0am: Hands employed spreading awnings & replacing gear

7.35am: Weighed anchor & proceeded, course & speed as requisite in company with HMS COMUS for torpedo exercises

9.30am: Course & speed as requisite for torpedo attack on HMS HIGHFLYER

9.40am: Fired two torpedoes

10.20am: Stopped & lowered second whaler

10.40am: Hoisted one torpedo

10.50am: Hoisted second torpedo

11.5am: Proceeded as requisite with HMS COMUS for torpedo attack by HMS HIGHFLYER

12.35pm: Hoisted motor boat, proceeded with HMS HIGHFLYER as requisite for mooring in Trincomali Harbour

8.30am: Hands employed cleaning ship, shipwrights preparing targets

10.15am: Discharged six ratings to HMS COMUS

12.45pm: Paid monthly payment

6.50am: Landed RC church party

[Log signed as follows]

Inspected 7 May 1920 Hugh D Tothill, Rear Admiral, Commander in Chief, East Indies Station [Rear Admiral Hugh Tothill was Commander in Chief, East Indies Station from 1919 to 1921]

8.30am: Took two patt II targets in tow

8.45am: Weighed & proceeded out of harbour & as requisite for towing target for HMS HIGHFLYER

11.15am: HMS HIGHFLYER opened fire

11.35am: HMS HIGHFLYER finished firing, stopped engines, hauled in target

12.40am: Proceeded slow speed with targets in tow

1.0pm: Target wire carried away

2.0pm: Targets in tow, proceeded as requisite for "throw off" firing with HMS COMUS

2.47pm: HMS COMUS commenced

4.0pm: Proceeded back to harbour

6.0pm: Stopped, hauled in target

8.40am: C in C East Indies Station embarked

8.45am: Weighed & proceeded, course & speed as requisite with HMS COMUS for 6" full charge throw off firing

11.0am: Proceeded as requisite with HMS COMUS for mooring ship in Trincomali Harbour

12.25pm: HE Commander in Chief left the ship

6.30am: Diving party prepared gear for diving

9.0am: Divers went down to scrape ship's bottom

7.45am: Divers commenced scraping ship&rsquos bottom

8.0am: Dressed ship overall

12.0N: Fired salute of 21 guns

9.30am: HE Commander in Chief came on board to inspect ship&rsquos company & ship

11.50am: HE Commander in Chief disembarked

6.15am: HMS HIGHFLYER & HMS COMUS proceeded to sea

6.45am: Proceeded as requisite for going alongside SS WAR NIZAM for oil

7.30am: Secured alongside starboard side

1.40pm: Finished oiling, received 550 tons

2.5pm: Shoved off from oiler

7.0am: Landed RC church party

7.30am: Landed Wesleyan church party

6.30am: Diving party prepare diving gear

8,45am: Divers employed cleaning ship's bottom

9.15am Divers employed cleaning ship's bottom

9.30am: Divers employed cleaning ships' bottom

6.0am: Diving party rig diving boat, swimming class left ship to pass out

8.20am: Divers employed cleaning ship's bottom

6.0am: Diving party rig diving boat, swimming party employed passing out

8.20am: Divers employed cleaning ships' bottom

9.0am: Diving party employed cleaning ship's bottom

7.0am: Landed RC church party

1.0pm: Leave to watch from 1.30pm till 9.45pm, boys till 6.30pm

1.0pm: Hands to make & mend clothes

9.30am: Clear lower deck, hands fall in for drill, exercised "tow aft"

10.20am: Away all boats crews with masts & sails

1.30pm: Exercised boat sailing, coxwains in charge

6.0am: Diving party rig diving boat, swimming class to instructions, remainder hands cleaning ship

8.20am: Divers employed cleaning ship's bottom

9.30am: Marine detachment to drill

6.15am: Landed marine detachment with arms

9.25am: Gunnery training class to instructions, remainder hands employed spreading side screens & as requisite

2.30pm: Dockyard party landed to haul up targets onto slips

9.10am: Weighed & proceeded as requisite out of harbour

2.18pm: Batticaloa light house, abeam, 6.9 miles

9.50pm: Little Basses light, abeam, 6 miles

11.47pm: Great Basses light, abeam, 6 miles

1.54am: Hambantota light, abeam, 7.0 miles

5.0am: Dondra Head light, abeam, 6.4 miles

10.58am: Barberyn light house abeam, 4.8 miles, hands employed rigging acc [access] ladder & preparing ship for harbour

2.15pm: Pilot came on board, proceeded as requisite for entering harbour

2.35pm: Anchored in Colombo Harbour, secured to no 3 berth

3.40pm: One rating joined ship

6.30pm: Paymaster Lieutenant Commander discharged to hospital

6.35am: RC church party landed

8.14am: Presbyterians landed

8.0am: Dressed ship with masthead flags

9.10am: Divisions, read prayers

9.25am: Hands employed returning empty ammunition cases & as requisite

12.0N: Fired salute of 21 guns

6.45am: Officer of Guard boarded HMS ODIN [HMS ODIN was a Cadmus class sloop launched in 1901, 6 x 4" guns]

10.0am: 18 ratings joined ship

2.15pm: Hands employed surveying cable & as requisite

6.30pm: Loaded bad vegetables into lighter

8.0am: Dressed ship overall

12.0N: Fired salute of 21 guns

7.45am: Oil lighters secured alongside

9.10am: Hands employed striking down cable, remainder hands as requisite

9.30pm: One brass crutch lost overboard by accident

10.55am: Completed with oil, 174.9 tons

11.45am: Received 8 tons coal

9.30am: Hands employed preparing ship for sea

2.0pm: Cleared lower deck, read warrant no 23

3.0pm: Discharged 16 ratings for passage & one prisoner to HMS COMUS. 11 seedies to shore, one rating joined ship from HMS HIGHFLYER, two seedies joined for passage to Aden from HMS COMUS. Three Somali police joined for passage from HMS ODIN

4.5pm: Slipped & proceeded out of harbour

10.30pm: Slow both, water in oil fuel

5.50am: Sighted land (Cape Comorin), N

2.30pm: One coir broom lost overboard

3.55am: Sighted Minikoi light reflection [Now Minicoy Island light]

6.0am: Minikoi light abeam, 12.5 miles

9.7pm: Stopped, water in oil fuel

9.30am: Divisions, read prayers

2.15pm: Hands employed overhauling canvas gear & as requisite

9.20am: Torpedo training class to instruction, gunlayers to dotter, remainder employed as requisite

9.15am: Stopped both engines

9.30am: Slow ahead both engines

2.0pm: Lost overboard by accident, lines, log, 65 fms, one in number, patt no 316A & rotator, spare, one in number, patt no 315C

10.20am: Torpedo training class to instructions, marine detachment to Lewis gun instructions, remainder hands employed as requisite

2.0pm: Sighted land, starboard beam

4.25pm: Exercised collision stations

7.51am: Ras Marshaq light house, 4 points on starboard bow

9.10am: Stopped to pick up pilot

9.25am: Anchored, secured alongside oiler LUARTA

2.20pm: Completed oiling, received 550 tons

2.45pm: Weighed anchor & proceeded for anchorage

3.0pm: Anchored, secured stern to no 4 buoy

4.30pm: Paid monthly payment

[The logs for 6 June to 31st December 1920 have been duplicated in their entirety. Following is the first set.

The second set contains the same text, in every instance checked.

These are not duplicated scans of the same pages &ndash corrections etc are different. One is clearly a handwritten copy of the other, with no differences or additional information found in the second set.


Ship model Royal Caroline, wooden kit Panart

Royal Yacht the Royal Caroline was built at Bedford shipyard in 1749 as yacht for the English Royal Family.

Scale 1:47, Length: 830 mm
Display scale kit difficulty: 3

Royal Yacht the Royal Caroline was built at Bedford shipyard in 1749 as yacht for the English Royal Family. She served for many years, during which she sailed all around the world. She was finally broken up in 1820. This beautiful ship had an extremely competitive line for racing as well as a rich set of ornamentation all around the hull.
Royal Caroline Model Ship was a Royal Yacht built for the use of George II and his wife, Queen Caroline. She was sailed for pleasure cruises by the Royal Family and as a transport for members of the court sailing between England and Holland.
On the latter occasions, she was accompanied by as many as four frigates, and when the King was on Board, accompanied by the First Lord of the Admiralty, her distinguished captains included Sir William Cornwallis and Sir Hyde Parker.
In 1761, the vessel was renamed Charlotte (later Royal Charlotte) for George’s III Princess Sophie Charlotte.

The kit features the following: This advanced kit is suitable for ship kit builders who previously built two or more models of a similar style.
A double plank on frame hull construction, building plans with general details English instructions booklet, full set of lost wax brass castings walnut and lime planking, wooden masts and spars, brass and walnut fittings, etched details, rigging cord. All sheet ply sections are laser cut for accuracy.

CAUTION!! Although these are high quality ship model kits, they may not be suitable for some one not familiar with building of wooden model ship kits. See more.