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Jacob Jones I DD- 61 - History

Jacob Jones I DD- 61 - History


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Jacob Jones I

(DD-61: dp. 1,160; 1. 316'3"; b. 30'7"; dr. 9'9"; s. 30 k..
cpl. 99; a. 4 4", 8 21" tt.; cl. Tucker)

The first Jacob Jones (DD-61) was laid down 3 August 1914 by New York Shipbuildir7g Corp.. Camden, N.J.: launched 29 3Iay 1916; sponsore(l hv 3 rs. Jerome Parker Crittendon, great-granddaughter `of .Jacob Jones; and
commissioned 10 February 191ff, Lt. Gomdr. W. S. Pye in command.

After shakedown, Jacob Jone' began training exercises of f the New England coast until entering the Philadelphia Navy Yard for repairs. Upon the outbreak of war between the United States and Germany 6 April 1917, Jacob Jones patrolled off the Virginia coast before departing Boston for Europe 7 May.

Arriving Queenstown, Ireland, 17 May, she immediately began patrol and convoy escort duty in waters of the United Ringdom. On 8 July she picked up 44 survivors of the British steamship Valetta, the victim of a German U-boat. Two weeks later, while escorting British steamship Dafila, Jacob Jones~ sighted a periscope; but the steamship was torpedoed before an attack on the submarine could be launched. Once again a rescue ship, Jacob Jones~ took on board 25 survivors of the stricken Dapfila.

Throughout the summer the destroyer escorted supplyladen convoys and continued rescue operations in submarine-infested waters. On 19 Octaber she picked up 305 survivors of torpedoed British cruiser Orama. After special escort duty between Ireland and France, she departed Brest, France, 6 December on her return run to Queenstown. At 1621, as she steamed independently in the vicinity of the Isles of Scilly, her watch sighted a torpedo wake about a thousand yards distant. Although the destroyer maneuvered to escape, the high-speed torpedo struck her starboard side, rupturing her fuel oil tank. The crew worked courageously to save the ship; but as the stern sank, her depth charges exploded. Realizing the situation hopeless, Comdr. Bagley reluctantly ordered the ship abandoned. Eight minutes after being torpedoed, Jacob Jones sank with 64 men still on board.

The 38 survivors huddled together on rafts and boats in frigid Atlantic waters off the southwest coast of England. Two of her crew were taken prisoner by attacking submarine U-58 commanded by Kapitan Hans Rose. In a humanitarian gesture rare in modern war, Rose radioed the American base at Queenstown the approximate location and drift of the survivors. Throughout the night of 6 to 7 December British sloop-of-war Camellia and British liner Catalina conducted rescue operations. By 0830 the following morning HMS Insolent picked up the last survivors of Jacob Jones.


Jacob Jones I DD- 61 - History

USS Jacob Jones , a 1150-ton Tucker class destroyer built at Camden, New Jersey, was commissioned in February 1916. She served along the East Coast during the next year and conducted war patrols in the same area for a month after the United States' April 1917 entry into the First World War. In May 1917, Jacob Jones crossed the Atlantic to begin anti-submarine patrols and convoy escort work out of Queenstown, Ireland. She rescued survivors of several torpedoed ships during the next several months. On 6 December 1917, while en route from Brest, France, to Queenstown, USS Jacob Jones was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-53 . Her survivors were rescued by British ships after the German submarine's Commanding Officer, the daring and very successful Hans Rose, reported their location by radio.

USS Jacob Jones was named in honor of Commodore Jacob Jones, USN, (1768-1850), a naval hero of the War of 1812.

This page features all the views we have related to USS Jacob Jones (Destroyer # 61).

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USS Jacob Jones (Destroyer # 61)

Underway in 1916, soon after she was completed.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 79KB 740 x 445 pixels

USS Melville (Destroyer Tender # 2)

Tending U.S. Navy destroyers at Queenstown, Ireland, 1917.
The destroyers present include (from left to right):
USS Jacob Jones (Destroyer # 61)
USS Ericsson (Destroyer # 56)
USS Wadsworth (Destroyer # 60)
and an unidentified ship.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 77KB 740 x 510 pixels

Photo #: Smithsonian 72-4509-A

USS Jacob Jones (Destroyer # 61)

Sinking off the Scilly Islands, England, on 6 December 1917, after she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-53 .
Photographed by Seaman William G. Ellis.

Smithsonian Institution Photograph.

Online Image: 70KB 740 x 470 pixels

Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Stanton F. Kalk, USN

Painting by F. Luis Mora, depicting Lt(JG) Kalk assisting survivors of USS Jacob Jones (Destroyer # 61) after she was sunk by the German submarine U-53 off the Scilly Isles on 6 December 1917.
A plaque accompanying this painting read: "The Jacob Jones was sunk by an enemy torpedo between Brest and Queenstown. Lieutenant (jg) S.F. Kalk rendered conspicuous and gallant services after the ship sank by helping men from one raft to another so as to equalize the weight on the rafts. He died of exposure and exhaustion in order to save others. Lieutenant (jg) Kalk was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal posthumously."

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 75KB 740 x 505 pixels

USS Jacob Jones (Destroyer # 61)

Ship's survivors following their rescue. Jacob Jones was sunk off the Scilly Isles by the German submarine U-53 , on 6 December 1917.


U.S.S. JACOB JONES

USS Jacob Jones received its name in honor of Commodore Jacob Jones who was a Navy hero of the War of 1812. The Navy brought her into service upon her commission in October 1919. Her initial voyages were in the Atlantic, but she reported early in 1920 for service in the Pacific. She performed well until the Navy decommissioned her in June 1922. The Navy brought her back to active duty in May 1930. After reactivation, she served for a few years in the Pacific and Caribbean before working the rest of the 1930s in the Atlantic.

In late 1938, USS Jacob Jones entered European and North African waters as part of Squadron 40-T. With the start of World War II in Europe, she returned to US waters to take up Neutrality Patrols along with submarine work. When the United States entered into the war in December 1941, USS Jacob Jones provided convoy escort out of Newfoundland. In February 1942, she began submarine patrol along the East Coast. On February 28 of that year, the German submarine U-578 struck her with at least two torpedoes. The heavily damaged ship sunk. Only a total of eleven survived the explosion and subsequent exposure.


Jacob Jones I DD- 61 - History

Three-month old Jacob Jones locks through the Panama Canal in 1920. View this and five other images in detail.

Laid down 21 February 1918, launched 20 November and commissioned 20 October 1919, the new ship operated briefly in the Atlantic, then joined the Pacific Fleet in January 1920. Except for a period in reserve between August 1920 and June 1921, she was active along the West Coast until decommissioned and laid up in June 1922.

The &ldquoJakie&rdquo recommissioned in May 1930, one of 60 mothballed flush-deckers returned to service in a crash program to replace a like number of ships discovered to be unfit for active duty. Until the spring of 1933, she operated in the eastern Pacific with one tour in the Caribbean then moved permanently to the Atlantic.

Jacob Jones crossed the Atlantic in late 1938 to join Lisbon-based Squadron 40-T with four-stack cruiser Trenton and destroyer Badger. They operated &ldquoin the western Mediterranean for the purpose of cultivating friendly relations and protecting American interests,&rdquo but returned to the United States in October 1939 after World War II broke out the previous month.

The outbreak of World War II in Europe in 1939 signaled the beginning of a German submarine onslaught against transatlantic shipping&mdasha strategy first seen during World War I. By January 1942, the allies had adopted a preliminary answer: a convoy system with an acceptable level of protection, made possible by deploying every available escort vessel in this service. That month, transatlantic convoys lost only three merchant ships. Unprotected, however, was merchant shipping along America&rsquos East Coast.

&ldquoNo more perfect set-up for rapid and ruthless destruction could have been afforded the Nazi sea lords &hellip &lsquoThe massacre enjoyed by U-boats along our Atlantic Coast in 1942 was as much a national disaster as if saboteurs had destroyed half a dozen of our biggest war plants&rsquo.&rdquo
&mdash Morison

Commanding the Eastern Sea Frontier&mdasha territory from the Canadian border to Jacksonville, Florida and from the coast 200 miles seaward&mdashwas VAdm. Adolphus (&ldquoDolly&rdquo) Andrews, who commandeered every available cutter, patrol craft, armed trawler, yacht and patrol aircraft. But such resources&mdashon which the convoy system depended&mdashwer e scarce when Germany declared war on the United States on 11 December 1941. The next day, Hitler ordered a blitz against undefended east coast shipping known as Operation Paukenschlag (&ldquoDrumbeat&rdquo).

Six U-boats arrived off the East Coast in January 1942. There they began sinking merchant ships at the rate of one per day. Through April, as their numbers grew, U-boats sank 82 merchant ships in the Eastern Sea Frontier and 55 more in the Bermuda Area, none of which were in convoy.

Desperate, Admiral Andrews asked for fifteen destroyers and was allotted seven on temporary detail to conduct &ldquoroving patrols.&rdquo These proved ineffective&mdashJacob Jones became an immediate casualty and their only sinking was Roper&rsquos destruction of U-85 by gunfire in mid-April.

In May, however, with an adequate number of escorts available at last, the convoy system was adopted from Halifax to Key West and the number of losses dropped to five. As the preponderance of sinkings shifted south to the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean, June was the last month when more than six merchant ships were lost in the Eastern Sea Frontier.

Attached to Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 27, Jacob Jones was assigned with DesDiv 54 sisters Roper, Dickerson and Herbert to the Atlantic Coast Sound School on its reorganization at Key West, Florida in December 1940. During the next two years, she also participated in Neutrality Patrols off the East Coast and in the Caribbean area and, with the United States&rsquo entry into World War II in December 1941, commenced escorting convoys from Argentia, Newfoundland.

In February 1942, under the command of LCdr. Hugh D. Black and executive officer LCdr. Thomas W. Marshall, Jr., Jacob Jones became the first destroyer assigned to roving anti-submarine patrols off the East Coast. Even before clearing the New York entrance channel on her first such patrol, she contacted and attacked a U-boat. While an oil slick suggested success, postwar German records did not show any U-boat lost at that time.

Standing out of New York Harbor again on 27 February, the &ldquoJakie&rdquo was originally assigned to patrol between New Jersey&rsquos Barnegat Light and Five Fathom Bank off Cape May, then ordered south to the area off Cape May and the Delaware Capes. Enroute she encountered the drifting wreckage of the 7,451-ton tanker R. P. Resor, torpedoed that morning by U- 578. After pausing for two hours to search for survivors, she resumed her patrol to the southwest.

Before dawn the following morning, Jacob Jones herself encountered U-578, but without making contact. Without warning, two torpedoes hit her port side. One detonated her forward magazine, destroying everything and everyone forward of the No. 2 stack. The second hit astern, obliterating everything aft of the point of impact. There may have been a third.

Jacob Jones&rsquo casualties, 28 February 1942.

Source: Bureau of Personnel casualty report, NARA .

An estimated 30 officers and men abandoned ship. Depth charges exploded as she sank, however, killing many in the water&mdashnone of her seven officers and only eleven of her men survived. An army observation plane spotted her rafts and reported their position to Eagle 56 of the inshore patrol, which rescued survivors 4&ndash5 hours later and took them to Cape May.

In 1943, Fletcher-class destroyers Black (DD 666) and Marshall (DD 676) were named for her CO and XO and launched at Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey. The first Edsall-class destroyer escort laid down, DE 130, was also named Jacob Jones.

Today, Jacob Jones&rsquo remains lie at a depth of 120&ndash130 feet. Her bow and stern are destroyed but her midsection is recognizable, with boilers and turbines visible and torpedoes in their tubes.

Sources: Morison, Vol. I and X Roscoe Veigele, PC Patrol Craft of World War II Wilde.


Jacob Jones I DD- 61 - History

The first Jacob Jones (DD-61) was laid down 3 August 1914 by New York Shipbuilding Corp.. Camden, N.J.: launched 29 May 1916 sponsored by Mrs. Jerome Parker Crittendon, great-granddaughter of Jacob Jones and commissioned 10 February 1917, Lieutenant Cmdr. W. S. Pye in command. It was destined to be the first American destroyer lost to enemy fire.

After shakedown, Jacob Jones began training exercises off the New England coast until entering the Philadelphia Navy Yard for repairs. Upon the outbreak of war between the United States and Germany 6 April 1917, Jacob Jones patrolled off the Virginia coast before departing Boston for Europe 7 May.

Arriving Queenstown, Ireland, 17 May, she immediately began patrol and convoy escort duty in waters of the United Kingdom. On 8 July she picked up 44 survivors of the British steamship Valetta, the victim of a German U-boat. Two weeks later, while escorting British steamship Dafila, Jacob Jones sighted a periscope but the steamship was torpedoed before an attack on the submarine could be launched. Once again a rescue ship, Jacob Jones took on board 25 survivors of the stricken Dapfila.

Throughout the summer the destroyer escorted supply laden convoys and continued rescue operations in submarine-infested waters. On 19 October she picked up 305 survivors of torpedoed British cruiser Orama. After special escort duty between Ireland and France, she departed Brest, France, 6 December on her return run to Queenstown. At 1621, as she steamed independently in the vicinity of the Isles of Scilly, her watch sighted a torpedo wake about a thousand yards distant. Although the destroyer maneuvered to escape, the high-speed torpedo struck her starboard side, rupturing her fuel oil tank. The crew worked courageously to save the ship but as the stern sank, her depth charges exploded. Realizing the situation hopeless, Comdr. Bagley reluctantly ordered the ship abandoned. Eight minutes after being torpedoed, Jacob Jones sank with 64 men still on board.

The 38 survivors huddled together on rafts and boats in frigid Atlantic waters off the southwest coast of England. Two of her crew were taken prisoner by attacking submarine U-53 commanded by Kapitan Hans Rose. In a humanitarian gesture rare in modern war, Rose radioed the American base at Queenstown the approximate location and drift of the survivors. Throughout the night of 6 to 7 December British sloop-of-war Camellia and British liner Catalina conducted rescue operations. By 0830 the following morning HMS Insolent picked up the last survivors of Jacob Jones.


USS Jacob Jones (DD 130)


US Naval Historical Center Photograph #NH52165

Completed in October 1919 and already decommissioned in 1922. 1930 recommissioned and mainly used in the Atlantic Fleet. From 1936 to 1939 in the Squadron 40-T, to protect American interests in the Spanish Civil War. 1940 Neutrality Patrol. Since 1941 on escort duty in the North Atlantic.

In January 1942, the destroyer attacked an unidentified U-boat while escorting the convoy SC-63 without visible results. Later escorted the convoy HX-169 and on 2 February, the destroyer attacked another U-boat contact, while escorting a Norwegian merchant, again without results, then escorted the convoy ON-59. On 22 February, the destroyer attacked a possible U-boat off Ambrose Light ship for five hours in 12 attacks, dropping all 57 depth charges, but only some oil slicks were seen on the surface.

On the morning of 27 February 1942 USS Jacob Jones (DD 130) (LtCdr Hugh David Black, USN) departed New York alone to patrol and search the area between Barnegat Light and Five Fathoms Bank. She then received orders to concentrate her patrol activity in waters off Cape May and the Delaware Capes. In the afternoon, the destroyer spotted the burning wreckage of the R.P. Resor which had been torpedoed by U-578. The destroyer circled the tanker for two hours, searching for survivors before resuming her southward course.

At 10.57 hours on 28 February, USS Jacob Jones was hit by two torpedoes from U-578 while proceeding completely blacked out at 15 knots. The first torpedo struck on the port side just aft of the bridge and ignited the ship´s magazine. The explosion completely destroyed the bridge, the chart room and the officer´s and petty officer´s quarters. As the ship stopped, the second torpedo struck on the port side about 40 feet forward of the fantail and carried away the after part of the ship above the keel plates and shafts and destroyed the after crew´s quarters. The ship remained afloat for 45 minutes, allowing about 30 survivors to abandon ship on four or five rafts. But as the stern sank, the unsecured depth charges exploded, killing several survivors on a nearby raft. Some hours later, an US Army observation plane sighted the life rafts and reported their position to USS PE-56 on Inshore Patrol. The patrol craft was forced to abandon her search after three hours, due to strong winds and rising seas. She had picked up twelve survivors, but one of them died en route to Cape May. The search for survivors continued for two days but was fruitless.

Location of attack on USS Jacob Jones (DD 130).

ship sunk.

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Contents

Jacob Jones was authorized in 1913 as the fifth ship of the Tucker class which, like the related O'Brien class, was an improved version of the Cassin-class destroyers authorized in 1911. Construction of the vessel was awarded to New York Shipbuilding of Camden, New Jersey, which laid down her keel on 3 August 1914. Ten months later, on 29 May 1915, Jacob Jones was launched by sponsor Mrs. Jerome Parker Crittendon, a great-granddaughter of the ship's namesake, Commodore Jacob Jones (1768–1850), a U.S. Navy officer during the War of 1812. Ώ] As built, Jacob Jones was 315 feet 3 inches (96.09 m) in length and 30 feet 6 inches (9.30 m) abeam and drew 9 feet 8 inches (2.95 m). The ship had a standard displacement of 1,060 long tons (1,080 t) and displaced 1,205 long tons (1,224 t) when fully loaded. ΐ]

Jacob Jones had two Curtis steam turbines that drove her two screw propellers, and an additional steam turbine geared to one of the propeller shafts for cruising purposes. The power plant could generate 17,000 shaft horsepower (13,000 kW) and move the ship at speeds up to 30 knots (56 km/h). Ώ] ΐ]

Jacob Jones ' main battery consisted of four 4-inch (102 mm)/50 Mark 9 guns, Ώ] Γ] [Note 2] with each gun weighing in excess of 6,100 pounds (2,800 kg). Γ] The guns fired 33-pound (15 kg) armor-piercing projectiles at 2,900 feet per second (880 m/s). At an elevation of 20°, the guns had a range of 15,920 yards (14,560 m). Γ]

Jacob Jones was also equipped with eight 21-inch (533 mm) torpedo tubes. The General Board of the United States Navy had called for two anti-aircraft guns for the Tucker-class ships, as well as provisions for laying up to 36 floating mines. ΐ] From sources, it is unclear if these recommendations were followed for Jacob Jones or any of the other ships of the class.


Projekt i budowa

„Jacob Jones” został zatwierdzony do budowy w 1913 roku [2] jako piąta jednostka typu Tucker, które podobnie jak okręty typu O𠆛rien były ulepszoną wersją niszczycieli typu Cassin, zatwierdzonych do budowy w 1911 roku. Budowa okrętu zostaᐪ przydzielona stoczni New York Shipbuilding z Camden, w której uzyskał numer stoczniowy 150 [4] . Stępkę położono 3 sierpnia 1914 roku. Dziesięć miesiᆜy później, 29 maja 1915 roku okręt został zwodowany, matką chrzestną zostaᐪ pani Jerome Parker Crittendon, praprawnuczka patrona okrętu: komodora Jacoba Jonesa (1768�), oficera US Navy [1] .

„Jacob Jones” był wyposażony w dwie turbiny parowe Curtisa, które z kolei napᆝzały dwie śruby. Okręt był tak៎ wyposażony w dodatkową turbinę parową napᆝzajၜą jedną ze śrub, wykorzystywaną w czasie rejsu z prᆝkoᖼią ekonomiczną. Maszynownia mogᐪ wygenerować moc 17򠀀 shp i rozpᆝzić okręt do prᆝkoᖼi 30 węzłów [1] [2] .

Główna artyleria okrętu sk�ᐪ się z 4 dział kal. 102 mm L/50 Mark 9 [1] [5] [b] . Ka𗳞 działo ważyło ponad 2800 kg [5] . Dziaᐪ wystrzeliwały 15-kilogramowe pociski przeciwpancerne z prᆝkoᖼią początkową 880 m/s. Przy podniesieniu luf równym 20° pociski miały zasięg 14򠕠 metrów [5] .

„Jacob Jones” był tak៎ wyposażony w osiem wyrzutni torped kal. 533 mm. General Board of the United States Navy nawoływaᐪ do umieszczenia dw༼h dział przeciwlotniczych na ka𗳞j jednostce typu Tucker, a tak៎ zapewnienie możliwoᖼi postawienia 36 min morskich [2] . Źr༽ᐪ nie podają jednak, czy te rekomendacje zostały wprowadzone w życie na „Jacob Jones” lub innej jednostce tego typu.


Births & Parish Baptisms

  • 1 July 1837 - Introduction of General Civil Registration of Births, Marriages and Deaths in England and Wales
  • Pre-1875 - an estimated 6 to 10% of births NOT registered
  • 1875 more rigorous enforcement of compulsory registration
  • September quarter 1837 to June quarter 1911 -- only first two full forenames, subsequent initials, registration district and reference number
  • September quarter 1911 to present -- only first forename, subsequent initials, registration district and number but also includes mother's maiden surname.

Jacob Jones I DD- 61 - History

  The ill-starred expedition of Gen. Braddock (an interesting sketch of which will be found elsewhere in this work, in the chapter on the French and Indian war) doubtless exerted a powerful influence in the early settlement of Allegany. The forces rendezvoused at Fort Cumberland, where they remained for a considerable time, and the expedition passed through the heart of the county both going and returning. Many of those attached to it remained in this section permanently, while others, attracted by the natural resources of the region, either returned later and settled in Allegany, or induced others to do so. An amount of exploration was accomplished, moreover, which would have required many years by the slower process of individual enterprise, and thus it will be perceived how benefits often spring from those events which at the time are regarded as unqualified misfortunes. The most available points for crossing the steep and rugged mountains were in many instances determined, and the shallow places in rivers and streams ascertained. Localities which have since become prominent in the history of the county were at that time brought into notice. “Little Meadows” and “Great Meadows,” “Little Crossings” and “Great Crossings,” figure prominently in Braddock’s march through this portion of Maryland. The experiences of Washington and other engineers attached to the expedition doubtless laid the foundations for the great national highway which was subsequently constructed through the part of the State.

An Englishman named Evart was the first white man who penetrated the wilds of the mountainous regions of Allegany County, after whom are named Evart’s, or as it is now generally written, Evitt’s, Creek and Evitt’s Mountain. Evart built his cabin on the top of Evitt’s Mountain, at the point where Evitt’s Creek rounds its steep and rugged point, some seven miles east of Cumberland, and about six or seven from the valley of the Potomac,—the Indian trail from Conococheague to the West. A portion of the rude chimney of his cabin is still remaining. He died before 1749, prior to which time the white settlements had not penetrated farther west than the Conococheague, now in Washington County, and even there the fierce struggle for the possession of the country was still going on between the whites and the aborigines.

Some difficulties were thrown in the way of bona fide settlers, moreover, by the action of the last proprietary of Maryland. He directed that no land warrants should be issued until ten thousand acres had been surveyed for himself in the territory west of Fort Cumberland. In the effort to gratify his wishes 127,680 acres were surveyed in different tracts. The board of judges of the Land Office was subsequently notified that the prohibition no longer existed, and, as sometimes happens in this enlightened age, a job was developed, or at least very strongly suspected. Notice that the Land Office was opened for the perfection of titles, was given in such a manner that those who had braved the toils and dangers of life to establish a home for themselves and their families could not possibly avail themselves of it in time to secure the fruits of their enterprise, while the wealthier class of speculators in the vicinity of the seat of government were enabled to pre-empt, to use a more modern term, the most valuable lands belonging to the public domain. Mr. Jenifer, the agent of the proprietary, fully exposed the injustice of the board, and a sharp controversy ensued, from which the agent emerged with flying colors, and rules were established for the governance of the whole subject which assured the rights of the early settlers. The previous instructions of the proprietary, however, doubtless had the effect of retarding emigration to this portion of the province.

The settlement of the county dates before the formation of the “Ohio Company.” Col. Thomas Cresap, the bold pioneer and Indian-fighter, located himself at Oldtown, on the north fork of the Potomac, with his own and other families, in 1741. On Jan. 15, 1755, the proprietary Governor, Horatio Sharpe, accompanied by Sir John St. Clair, set out from Annapolis to visit the camp at Mount Pleasant, on Will’s Creek, and returned February 2d. They found the settlement thriving, notwithstanding the threatened appearance of the Indians. In 1756 Fort Cumberland (“Mount Pleasant”) mounted ten carriage cannon, and contained a garrison of four hundred men, and May 5th of that year Capt. Dagworthy was in command.

On Feb. 11, 1762, a communication was published in the Maryland Gazette calling the attention of the public to the great advantages that would arise from “the opening of the Potomac River, and making it passable for small craft from Fort Cumberland, at Will’s Creek, to the Great Falls,” which would facilitate the commerce of Maryland and Virginia, and asking for subscriptions, which were to be paid to Col. George Mercer and Col. Thomas Prather, treasurers.

The following were appointed managers and authorized to solicit subscriptions: in Virginia, George Mercer, Jacob Hite, William Ramsay, John Carlyle, John Hite, Joseph Watson, James Keith, James Hamilton, John Hough, John Patterson, and Abraham Hite in Maryland, Rev. Thomas Bacon, Dr. David Ross, Christopher Lowndes, Thomas Cresap, Benjamin Chambers, Jonathan Hager, Thomas Prather, John Cary, Caspar Shaaf, Robert Peter, and Evan Shelby, any eight of whom were a sufficient number to proceed to business. The first meeting was held in Frederick Town, in May, 1762.

At the close of the French and Indian war the settlements rapidly increased until the Revolution, when immigration practically ceased. After the peace of 1783 new settlers flocked in from the old counties of the State, from Pennsylvania and Virginia, and from Europe. The population increased to such an extent that the inhabitants became tired and impatient of going so far as Hagerstown to transact their court and other public business, and agitated the question of a new county, with the county-seat at Cumberland.

The following is a list of settlers located in 1788 upon the lands lying in Maryland west of Fort Cumberland:

William Ashby, Anthony Able, George Anderson, Patrick Burnes, Charles Boyles, Thomas Baker, Philip Bray, Mallner Burnstredder, John Beall, John Blair, John Brendage, Peter Bonham, Norman Bruce, Daniel Cresap, Sr., Daniel Cresap, Jr., Robert Cresap, James Cresap, Joseph Cresap, John Durbin, Aaron Duckworth, Nicholas Durbin, William Durhane, John Doomer, Joseph Davis, Steven Davis, Levi Davis, Samuel Dawson, Sr., Samuel Elliott, Adam Eckhart, John Ervin, Herman Frazee, Joseph Frost, George Fegenbaker, Briant Gaines, Edward Grimes, Paul Grim, John Great, Benjamin Green, Sam. Humphreys, Edward Huston, James Henderson, John House, Ralph Adams, John Arnold, of A., John Arnold, of John, Andrew Bruce, William Barnes, Michael Beeme, Benjamin Brady, John Buhman, Ben. John Biggs, Frederick Bray, Thomas Barkus, George Barkus, Samuel Barrell, William Coddington, Peter Crawl, Thomas Cordray, Henry Crosley, John Cruise, Samuel Dawson, Jr., William Dawson, Sr., William Dawson, Jr., Edward Dawson, Sr., Edward Dawson, Jr., Thomas Dawson, Joseph Dye, Barney Dewitt, Terence Dyal, John Elbin, Samuel Ellison, John Eckhart, John Firman, John Friend, Gabriel Friend, Richard Green, Daniel Green, Thomas Greenwade, Salathiel Goff, John T. Goff, Andrew House, Elisha Hall, John Harshan, Moses Hall, Anthony Arnold, Moses Ayres, Sr., Moses Ayres, Jr., Robert Boyd, Matthew Ball, Frederick Burgett, Josiah Bonham, Micijah Burnham, Amariah Bonham, John Brufly, John Buckholder, Jacob Beall, Nathan Corey, Godfrey Corbus, Edmund Cutler, Ely Clark, Michael Corn, Benjamin Coddington, Samuel Durbin, James Denison, Peter Doogan, Samuel Durbin, Edward Davis, Jacob Duttro, Sr., Jacob Duttro, Jr., Peter Devecmon, David Eaton, George Eckhart, Charles Friend, Hezekiah Frazier, Joseph Friend, Harry Franks, George Fiddler, James C. Goff, Evan Gwynn, John Glasman, John Garey, John Glaze, Nicholas Holsbury, Charles Huddy, Richard Hall, George Harness, George Haver, William Howell, Paul Hoye, Robert Johnston, Evan James, Conrad Joleman, John Keyser, Henry Kite, John Lowdermilk, William Logsden, Daniel Levit, Jacob Lower, Rosemond Long, Joseph Lee, Stephen Masters, Gabriel McKinsy, John Matthews, Sr., John Magomery, Christopher Myers, James McMullen, Nathaniel Magruder, Josiah Magruder, Samuel McKinsy, Peter Nimirck, George Paine, Henry Porter, Moses Porter, George Preston, Henry Peters, John Purguson, Peter Poling, Stephen Pierson, Godfrey Richards, William Rideford, John Richards, John Rubast, Daniel Recknor, John Simpkins, Jacob Storm, George Sapp, John Steyer, Garrett Snedeger, John Strickler, Matthew Singleman, John Stuck, John Trotter, David Troxell, Peter Tittle, Sr., Ezekiel Totter, James Utter, Sr., James Utter, Jr. John Vanbuskirk, Moses Williams, Adam Hicksenbaugh Benjamin Hull, Richard Harcourt, William Jones, John Jonas, William Jacobs, Jacob Koontz, Henry Kemp, George Laporte, William Logsden, Ralph Logsden, Elisha Logsden, John Lynn, Zachariah Linton, Henry Mattingly, Henry Myers, Philip Michael, Moses Munro, Josiah McKinsy, John Metz, James McPipe, Thomas Matthew, John Neff, Johannes Paugh, Robert Parker, Gabriel Powell, Nicholas Pittinger, Henry Pittinger, Hezekiah Pound, Martin Poling, Sr., John Price, John Ryan, John Rhoads, John Ratton, David Robertson, Adam Rhoads, Peter Stuck, William Show, Joseph Scott, Simon Speed, Matthew Snooke, John Seyler, William Stagg, James Schimer, Peter Tittle, Jr., Michael Tedrick, Jesse Tomlinson, John Trimble, William Utter, Thomas Umbertson, David Vansickle, William Wells, Samuel Hatton, Abraham Hite, Jacob Hazlewood, Samuel Jackson, William Jones, Jacob Kreger, John Kelly, Leonard Stimble, David Lee, John Liptz, Breton Levit, Jacob Lee, James Montain, William Moore, John Matthews, Jr., Jacob Miller, Alexander Moore, Daniel Moore, Moses McKinsy, Daniel McKinsy, Conrad Millen, Elias Majors, John Nepton, Samuel Postlewait, Michael Paugh, Margaret Poling, John Porter, Samuel Poling, Martin Poling, Richard Poling, Charles Queen, Benjamin Rush, Enoch Read, Roger Robertson, Aaron Rice, Michael Raway, John Ragan, John Streets, Moses Spicer, Abel Serjeant, Adam Seigler, Jacob Seigler, Jacob Scutchfield, John Sibley, Frederick Thoxter, John Tomlinson, Jacob Trullinger, Moses Tilsonel, Richard Tilton, Charles Uhl, John Vincent, Henry Woodger, John Workman, Archibald White, Arthur Watson, Jesse Walter, John Wikoff, Alexander Wilhelm, George Wilhelm, Peter Wikoff, Jacob Wikoff, James Woodringer, Alpheus Wig-wire, George Waddle, Isaac Workman, Joseph Warnick, William Workman, James Wells, Peter Wells, Samuel Wikoff, George Winters, Andrew Workman, Jacob Workman, Stephan Workman, Thomas Williams, John Whiteman.

The General Assembly in 1777, as is shown elsewhere, enacted that a bounty of fifty acres should be granted to every able-bodied recruit who should serve three years in the American army, and one hundred acres to each recruiting officer who enlisted twenty men. By the act of 1781 these lands were to be located in the State west of Fort Cumberland. By the act of 1787, Francis Deakins was appointed to survey these lands, and his report showed that forty-one hundred and sixty-five lots of fifty acres each had been laid off, and that three hundred and twenty-three families were settled on six hundred and thirty-six of said lots already improved and cultivated. By the act of 1788 these settlers were allowed to purchase their lots at prices varying from five to twenty shillings per acre, in three equal payments of one, two, and three years. By subsequent acts the Maryland officers and soldiers were secured in the lots to which they were entitled for military services. The following is from the Maryland Journal of Friday, July 3, 1789:

“Notice is hereby given to the officers and soldiers of the Maryland Line, that a distribution of land will be made to them at Upper Marlborough, in Prince George’s County, on the 1st and 2d of August next, agreeably to an act of Assembly, and at the same time and place will be offered at public sale about one thousand lots of land, of fifty acres each, for ready money, or specie certificates of the State of Maryland. This land lies to the westward of Fort Cumberland. For a particular description thereof, apply to Capt. Daniel Cresap or Mr. John Tomlinson, who lives near the same.

At the session of the Legislature in 1789 a petition was presented asking for the erection of a new county, and the following act was passed on the 25th of December of that year:

“AN ACT for the division of Washington County, and for the erecting of a new one by the name of Allegany.

“WHEREAS, A number of the inhabitants of Washington County, by their petition to the General Assembly, have prayed that an act may pass for a division of said county by Sideling Hill Creek, and for the erection of a new one out of the western part thereof, and it appearing to this General Assembly that the erecting such a new county will conduce greatly to the due administration of justice and the speedy settling and improving the western part thereof, and the ease and convenience of the inhabitants thereof,

“II. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of Maryland, That all that part of Washington County which lies to the westward of Sideling Hill Creek shall be and is hereby erected into a new county, by the name of Allegany County, and the inhabitants thereof shall have, hold, and enjoy all such rights and privileges as are held and enjoyed by the inhabitants of any other county in this State.

“III. And be it enacted, That the County Court and Orphans’ Court for Allegany County shall be held at the town of Cumberland until the voters of said county, by election to be held as hereinafter provided, shall determine on some other place and until a place may be fixed on by the said election, and a court-house shall be built, the justices of said county may contract and agree at the county charge for a convenient place in the said town to hold their courts, and for a convenient place in the said town for the keeping of their books, papers, and records.

“IV. And be it enacted, That all causes, pleas, processes, and pleadings which now are or shall be depending in Washington County Court before the first Monday in December, 1790, shall and may be prosecuted as effectually in that court as if this act had not been made and in case any deeds or conveyances of land in that part of Washington County now called Allegany County have been or shall be, before the first Monday in December, 1790, acknowledged according to law, the enrollment or recording thereof in either of the said counties within the time limited by law shall be good and available.

“V. And be it enacted, That the county charge of Washington County heretofore assessed shall be collected and applied as if this act had not been made.

“VI. And be it enacted, That the County Court and Orphans’ Court of Allegany County shall first be held on the first Monday in April, 1791, and the said County Court be afterwards held on the first Monday in April and September, yearly, and the said Orphans’ Court shall be afterwards held on the second Monday in the months of June, August, October, and December, and the same courts shall have the same powers and jurisdiction respectively as other County and Orphans’ Courts within this State.

“VII. And be it enacted, That all civil causes to be brought in Allegany County shall be determined within two courts from the Appearance Court, and none shall continue longer, unless under such circumstances as civil causes in other County Courts may be continued longer than three courts from the Appearance Court.

“VIII. And be it enacted, That the Governor and Council be authorized and required to commission fit and proper persons as justices of the peace, and fit and proper persons as the Orphans’ Courts, as also surveyor and other officers, and that a fit and proper person be appointed by the Governor and Council sheriff of Allegany County, and be commissioned and qualified in the usual manner to continue in office until a new appointment shall take place in the other counties of this State, under an election according to the constitution and form of government.

“IX. And be it enacted, That at the first election to be held in the said county for sheriff, the voters of said county shall and may, by a majority of votes, determine the place at which the courts of the said county shall be held after the said election.”

Thus Allegany County was organized. It was created wholly out of the territory of Washington County, the latter parting with more than two-thirds of its superficial area, 672,000 acres, and a population of 5000 inhabitants. The act creating the county made no provision, as will be seen, for a voting-place, but elections were held until 1799 at Cumberland, which had been chosen by the people as the county-seat. Fortunately for the comfort of the citizens there were few officers chosen by ballot in those days, the only county officials being members of the Legislature and sheriff, or the electors would have been subjected to great inconvenience in traveling from Sideling Hill Creek on the one side, and Fairfax Stone on the other, to exercise their right as freemen. Many persons in those days were absolutely debarred from voting by the distance to be traversed, as was the case also in the other counties of Maryland, and in 1799 an act was passed by the General Assembly for the appointment of commissioners in every county of the State to lay off the counties into districts. The commissioners for Allegany were John B. Beall, David Hoffman, Thomas Stewart, William Shaw, George Robinet (of Nathan), and Jesse Tomlinson. Allegany was divided into six election districts, numbered from one to six, which were better known by their local names, as the Glades, Selbysport, Westernport, Musselanes, Cumberland, and Oldtown. The county remained districted as above from 1799 to 1817, in which year the Legislature passed an act for the redivision of the county into eight districts, and appointed the following commissioners for that purpose: Isaac Oyman, William Reid, William McMahon, George Newman (of Butler), and John Simpkins. The commission discharged its duty, and divided the county into the required number of election districts. The division of 1799 was generally adhered to, but a new district was established in the eastern end of the county, then and now known as No. 8, or Little Orleans and in the west No. 3, or Little Crossings, as it was known till 1850, when the polls were removed from this place to Grantsville by an act of the Legislature. The latter is the largest district in Garrett County, both in point of territory and population, having over four hundred voters, double the number of the district (Selbysport) from which it was taken. A considerable amount of its jurisdiction and population were added to Frostburg in 1856.

The members of the board which made the division are now dead. McMahon was the father of the eminent lawyer John V.L. McMahon. Reed was a prominent man of the county, and died in 1848. Newman was a “Little Crossing’s” man, and has been dead for fifty years. Simpkins lived in Selbysport District.

Since 1817 no general districting of the county has been made. As new districts were from time to time needed for the convenience of voters, they were authorized by acts of the Legislature, and laid off by three commissioners named in the act, who reported their proceedings to the County Court. By the act of 1835 Ryan’s Glades, or No. 10, was established 1849, Accident, or No. 11 1852, Nos. 12 and 13 1852, No. 14, or Song Run. In 1860 Nos. 15 and 16 were “surveyed and laid out.” These two districts are now known as Oakland and Lonaconing respectively. In 1872 the 17th District was created for the benefit of the Barton voters.

The county of Allegany displayed a proper spirit of patriotism upon the breaking out of the last war between the United States and Great Britain. Her citizens volunteered promptly, and several large companies marched to Baltimore to defend that city from the threatened attacks of the British forces. The record will be found in the chapter on the war of 1812.

(Source: The History of Western Maryland: being a history of Frederick, Montgomery, Carroll, Washington, Alleghany, and Garrett Counties from the earliest period to the present day, Vol. 2, Chapter LV, Louis H. Everts, 1882.)


Jacob Jones I DD- 61 - History

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