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Videos on the war - History

Videos on the war - History


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The War of 1812 has been made possible by a major grant from The National Endowment for the Humanities, with funding provided by Wilson Foundation Warren and Barbara Goldring, The … More

The War of 1812 has been made possible by a major grant from The National Endowment for the Humanities, with funding provided by Wilson Foundation Warren and Barbara Goldring, The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, The Arthur Vining Davis Foundations and Phil Lind.


Latest Videos

Discover the latest video and lectures brought to you by the Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation.

Agents of Change 2020: Meet the Candidates

Exploring the Election of 1800, with modern-day commentators.

Agents of Change 2020: Democracy Debate

Welcome to Decision 1800: The Presidential Debate.

Each year on October 19, Yorktown Day commemorates the surrender of General Cornwallis’ British and German troops at Yorktown to General Washington’s Allied American and French troops in 1781 and recognize the sacrifices of those who fought to win American independence.

History of Yorktown Day

Commemorating the surrender of General Cornwallis’ British and German troops at Yorktown on October 19, 1781.

After the Boom

Artillery in the American Revolution

What did people in the 17th century do when they got sick? Join us at Jamestown Settlement to find out what an apothecary is and why he would keep a garden. Master science skills as you learn about how plants became medicines.

Staying Healthy, Full and Clean: Apothecarist Garden

Join us at Jamestown Settlement to find out what an apothecary is and why he would keep a garden.

How did English settlers in Virginia get food in a strange land? Explore the importance of agriculture at Jamestown and learn why chickens, greyhounds and other animals lived in the fort – hint: not every animal was there to be eaten!

Staying Healthy, Full and Clean: Feeding a Colony

Explore the importance of agriculture at Jamestown and learn why chickens, greyhounds and other animals lived in the fort.

Are you washing your hands and clothes a lot these days? Laundry was much harder to do in the 17th century than with the washing machines of today! Join us to discover the many steps English settlers had to take just to get their clothes clean. Find out who did the laundry in the Jamestown colony and what clothing displayed about a person’s status.

Staying Healthy, Full and Clean: In Hot Water

Join us to discover the many steps English settlers had to take just to get their clothes clean.

Have you ever had a tummy ache or the sniffles? Who’s the first person you go to when you do? Dr. Mom was the go-to person for help in the 18th century too! Join us to learn about 18th-century remedies for colonial ailments and find out what resources a farmer had on hand to cure you of headaches, indigestion or other unpleasantness.

Colonial Moms: Home Remedies

Join us to learn about 18th-century remedies for colonial ailments.

18th-century baskets came in all shapes and sizes and were used for a variety of everyday chores on a colonial farm during the time of the American Revolution. Ever wonder how these beautiful baskets were made? Join our basket maker on the farm to learn the first steps in acquiring and preparing materials and getting started with weaving a basket.

Colonial Moms: How to Weave a Basket – Part 1

Join our basket maker on the farm to learn how to get started with weaving a basket.

What determines the shape and size of an 18th-century basket? How does it take shape and expand? How will the basket maker finish the basket? Join us as we continue to learn about the techniques and skills required to weave an 18th-century basket.

Colonial Moms: How to Weave a Basket – Part 2

Join us as we continue to learn about the techniques and skills required to weave an 18th-century basket.

Tune in for a personal tour of Susan Constant, a re-creation of one of the three ships that brought the English colonists to Jamestown in 1607. Explore where the sailors and colonists lived, learn what they brought with them for the long voyage or to build the colony, and dive below to see spaces that are not normally open to the public.

Life at Sea: Larboard and Starboard, Bow and Stern

Take a personal tour of a re-creation of one of the three ships that brought the English colonists to Jamestown in 1607.

What has a foot, earrings, and leeches? Don’t have a clew? We’ll teach you the sailor’s vernacular as you learn to set sail aboard one of Jamestown Settlement’s re-created ships.

Life at Sea: Set Sail

Learn the sailor’s vernacular as you learn to set sail aboard one of Jamestown Settlement’s re-created ships.


Videos on the war - History

A look at the people and events that shaped the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Covering American History C-SPAN style: with event coverage, eyewitness accounts, and discussions with authors, historians and teachers. Every weekend from 8am ET Saturday to 8am ET Monday on C-SPAN3.

In January, 2011, C-SPAN expanded its programming offerings with a new history-based service airing weekends on C-SPAN3. American History TV (AHTV) features programming geared toward history lovers with 48 hours every weekend of people and events that document the American story.

C-SPAN began C-SPAN3 operations in January 2001 as a digital service. C-SPAN3 is currently available in 49 million digital cable TV households and is streamed live online at C-SPAN.org.

At the time of the launch of American History TV, C-SPAN co-president Susan Swain said: "We’re hoping American History TV does for history enthusiasts what Book TV has done for non-fiction book lovers."


Was the Civil War About Slavery?

What caused the Civil War? Did the North care about abolishing slavery? Did the South secede because of slavery? Or was it about something else entirely. perhaps states' rights? Colonel Ty Seidule, Professor of History at the United States Military Academy at West Point, settles the debate.

For more information on the Civil War, check out The West Point History of the Civil War, an interactive e-book that brings the Civil War to life in a way that's never been done. Click here

In the middle of the 19th century, both North and South ___________.

What document did President Abraham Lincoln issue in 1863?

The slave society was only embraced by plantation owners.

The secession documents of every Southern state made clear, crystal clear, that they were leaving the Union in order to ___________.

Why was the American Civil War fought?

Was the American Civil War fought because of slavery? More than 150 years later this remains a controversial question.

Why? Because many people don't want to believe that the citizens of the southern states were willing to fight and die to preserve a morally repugnant institution. There has to be another reason, we are told. Well, there isn't.

The evidence is clear and overwhelming. Slavery was, by a wide margin, the single most important cause of the Civil War -- for both sides. Before the presidential election of 1860, a South Carolina newspaper warned that the issue before the country was, "the extinction of slavery," and called on all who were not prepared to, "surrender the institution," to act. Shortly after Abraham Lincoln's victory, they did.

The secession documents of every Southern state made clear, crystal clear, that they were leaving the Union in order to protect their "peculiar institution" of slavery -- a phrase that at the time meant "the thing special to them." The vote to secede was 169 to 0 in South Carolina, 166 to 7 in Texas, 84 to 15 in Mississippi. In no Southern state was the vote close.

Alexander Stephens of Georgia, the Confederacy's Vice President clearly articulated the views of the South in March 1861. "Our new government," he said, was founded on slavery. "Its foundations are laid, its cornerstone rests upon the great truth that the Negro is not equal to the white man that slavery, submission to the superior race, is his natural and normal condition." Yet, despite the evidence, many continue to argue that other factors superseded slavery as the cause of the Civil War.

Some argue that the South only wanted to protect states' rights. But this raises an obvious question: the states' rights to what? Wasn't it to maintain and spread slavery? Moreover, states' rights was not an exclusive Southern issue. All the states -- North and South -- sought to protect their rights -- sometimes they petitioned the federal government, sometimes they quarreled with each other. In fact, Mississippians complained that New York had too strong a concept of states' rights because it would not allow Delta planters to bring their slaves to Manhattan. The South was preoccupied with states' rights because it was preoccupied first and foremost with retaining slavery.

Some argue that the cause of the war was economic. The North was industrial and the South agrarian, and so, the two lived in such economically different societies that they could no longer stay together. Not true.

In the middle of the 19th century, both North and South were agrarian societies. In fact, the North produced far more food crops than did the South. But Northern farmers had to pay their farmhands who were free to come and go as they pleased, while Southern plantation owners exploited slaves over whom they had total control.

And it wasn't just plantation owners who supported slavery. The slave society was embraced by all classes in the South. The rich had multiple motivations for wanting to maintain slavery, but so did the poor, non-slave holding whites. The "peculiar institution" ensured that they did not fall to the bottom rung of the social ladder. That's why another argument -- that the Civil War couldn't have been about slavery because so few people owned slaves -- has little merit.

Finally, many have argued that President Abraham Lincoln fought the war to keep the Union together, not to end slavery. That was true at the outset of the war. But he did so with the clear knowledge that keeping the Union together meant either spreading slavery to all the states -- an unacceptable solution -- or vanquishing it altogether.

In a famous campaign speech in 1858, Lincoln said, "A house divided against itself cannot stand." What was it that divided the country? It was slavery, and only slavery. He continued: "I believe this government cannot endure permanently half slave and half free. It will become all one thing, or all the other." Lincoln's view never changed, and as the war progressed, the moral component, ending slavery, became more and more fixed in his mind. His Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 turned that into law.

Slavery is the great shame of America's history. No one denies that. But it's to America's everlasting credit that it fought the most devastating war in its history in order to abolish slavery.

As a soldier, I am proud that the United States Army, my army, defeated the Confederates. In its finest hour, soldiers wearing this blue uniform -- almost two hundred thousand of them former slaves themselves -- destroyed chattel slavery, freed 4 million men, women, and children from human bondage, and saved the United States of America.

I'm Colonel Ty Seidule, Professor and Head, Department of History at the United States Military Academy, West Point for Prager University.


Videos on the war - History

Join students in college classrooms to hear lectures on topics ranging from the American Revolution to 9-11.

Covering American History C-SPAN style: with event coverage, eyewitness accounts, and discussions with authors, historians and teachers. Every weekend from 8am ET Saturday to 8am ET Monday on C-SPAN3.

In January, 2011, C-SPAN expanded its programming offerings with a new history-based service airing weekends on C-SPAN3. American History TV (AHTV) features programming geared toward history lovers with 48 hours every weekend of people and events that document the American story.

C-SPAN began C-SPAN3 operations in January 2001 as a digital service. C-SPAN3 is currently available in 49 million digital cable TV households and is streamed live online at C-SPAN.org.

At the time of the launch of American History TV, C-SPAN co-president Susan Swain said: "We’re hoping American History TV does for history enthusiasts what Book TV has done for non-fiction book lovers."


YouTube mass demonetizes World War 1 history channel The Great War

YouTube’s increasingly strict monetization rules have hit yet another history channel. The Great War, a channel that focuses on World War 1 history and has over one million subscribers, has had many of its three-year-old videos suddenly demonetized after YouTube decided they were no longer advertiser-friendly.

In a video explaining the situation, Flo, the producer of The Great War, said that he decided to check how YouTube’s current uptick in demonetization was affecting the channel. He added that the channel has previously had very few issues with YouTube monetization:

“In fact, I was actually quite, how would you say, pleasantly surprised that some of our videos with rather violent topics, but still educational videos nonetheless, about things like plastic surgery or storm troopers, which are also some of our most popular episodes actually got green-lit from YouTube after manual review. For us, that seemed like a signal that they would actually value educational content in some form.”

However, upon reviewing the monetization status of The Great War’s videos, he was presented with a huge list of videos with the infamous yellow dollar sign which means the video is “Not suitable for most advertisers.” Flo said that videos from 2018 and 2019 were “mostly fine” but “over 250 of our videos have been demonetized now.” Many of the demonetized videos were originally published and approved for monetization in 2016.

Source: YouTube – The Great War

Flo described YouTube’s lack of transparency during the process and said he received no notification from YouTube about this demonetization. According to Flo, most people who find The Great War, want to watch the videos chronologically so demonetizing these older videos is “really hurting the channel.”

One of the most concerning aspects of this decision for Flo is that “YouTube can change their mind any minute and if they do, they’re also going to apply all their new rules and terms of service retroactively to all the existing content out there.”

Flo’s story is reflective of many other YouTubers in 2019 who have found, often without any advanced warning from YouTube, that their videos or channels are either no longer monetized or even removed outright. As Flo puts it: “They don’t seem to have an interest in supporting creators like us via their monetization system.”

YouTubers in the educational space have been particularly hard hit by YouTube’s increasingly aggressive approach to demonetization and content removal. In June, Mr Allsop History, a channel that teaches Nazi history, was suddenly banned for “hate speech.” While the channel was eventually restored after an appeal, the incident showed how YouTube’s retroactive enforcement can instantly cripple a channel.

Multiple music education channels have also found their YouTube videos demonetized after YouTube’s broken copyright system was used to file false claims against their content.

Unfortunately, for educational YouTube channels geared towards young children, this trend is likely to get even bleaker in the future with YouTube recently announcing that YouTubers who are popular with kids are likely to face “significant business impact” and could find their ads, comments, and notifications disabled.

Going forward, Flo says The Great War will continue but be increasingly reliant on funding from Patreon supporters. Additionally, future projects will not be published to YouTube. Instead, Flo plans to host the content on The Great War’s website and offer streaming options in the future. Again, Flo’s sentiment is similar to that of many other YouTubers where the constant fear of demonetization leaves them looking for alternative platforms.


History and Politics

Other areas of American and World History can be found in a General History section, as well as through the Historyguy site map , listing the entirety of the Historyguy.com websites’ content. As new pages are created and or major edits are done to existing pages, those changes will be chronicled on the New Articles and Content Page . Also featured: specialty history and biography sections, and pop culture history, such as our popular history of comic books and superheroes site.

Historyguy.com contains significant content on matters about military history, but also delves into political history and current events. Recent wars in the Middle East, specifically the wars in Syria, Iraq, and Yemen, are all connected through the complex and violent history of that region. Connecting recent events and recent wars together and with the historical forces that lead to the present is part of the goal of this website.

Other Historyguy.com Related Resources:

Something new and historical: Want to learn how to drive a tank? Check out these tank driving experiences.

Essayforge.com – free history essay writing tips for college students.

History paper writing tutorials can be found at dao5conference.com – an online academic resource.

Studying history you may need help in writing. So you can contact pay Write My Paper Hub to have essays written for you.

Mypaperwriter.com is the best service for your history research papers.

Write My Essay Today provide the highest quality of paper writing.

Need help with your assignment? CopyCrafter hires assignment experts that always deliver.


AWARDS

Best in Class winner in both the Education and Reference categories at the 2011 Interactive Media Awards

Shortlisted in the Web Content Management category at the
2010 Econsultancy Innovation Awards

Highly Commended in the Digital Brand of the Year category at the 2010 PPA's Independent Publisher Awards

Nominated for Best Digital Solution of the Year (Consumer) at the 2010 International Customer Publishing Awards

Shortlisted in the Educational Entrepreneur category at the 2010 Digital Entrepreneur Awards


The Truth about the Vietnam War

Did the United States win or lose the Vietnam War? We are taught that it was a resounding loss for America, one that proves that intervening in the affairs of other nations is usually misguided. The truth is that our military won the war, but our politicians lost it. The Communists in North Vietnam actually signed a peace treaty, effectively surrendering. But the U.S. Congress didn't hold up its end of the bargain. In just five minutes, learn the truth about who really lost the Vietnam War.

Which of the following was a guarantee of the Paris Peace Accords?

What effect did the landslide Democratic victory of Congressional seats have on the Vietnam War?

Why did the new members of Congress have an investment in the outcome of the Vietnam War?

What happened to the South Vietnamese after their surrender?

South Vietnam's capital city, Saigon, was renamed by the North Vietnamese.

Decades back, in late 1972, South Vietnam and the United States were winning the Vietnam War decisively by every conceivable measure. That's not just my view. That was the view of our enemy, the North Vietnamese government officials. Victory was apparent when President Nixon ordered the U.S. Air Force to bomb industrial and military targets in Hanoi, North Viet Nam's capital city, and in Haiphong, its major port city, and we would stop the bombing if the North Vietnamese would attend the Paris Peace Talks that they had left earlier. The North Vietnamese did go back to the Paris Peace talks, and we did stop the bombing as promised.

On January the 23rd, 1973, President Nixon gave a speech to the nation on primetime television announcing that the Paris Peace Accords had been initialed by the United States, South Vietnam, North Vietnam, the Viet Cong, and the Accords would be signed on the 27th. What the United States and South Vietnam received in those accords was victory. At the White House, it was called "VV Day," "Victory in Vietnam Day."

The U.S. backed up that victory with a simple pledge within the Paris Peace Accords saying: should the South require any military hardware to defend itself against any North Vietnam aggression we would provide replacement aid to the South on a piece-by-piece, one-to-one replacement, meaning a bullet for a bullet a helicopter for a helicopter, for all things lost -- replacement. The advance of communist tyranny had been halted by those accords.

Then it all came apart. And It happened this way: In August of the following year, 1974, President Nixon resigned his office as a result of what became known as "Watergate." Three months after his resignation came the November congressional elections and within them the Democrats won a landslide victory for the new Congress and many of the members used their new majority to de-fund the military aid the U.S. had promised, piece for piece, breaking the commitment that we made to the South Vietnamese in Paris to provide whatever military hardware the South Vietnamese needed in case of aggression from the North. Put simply and accurately, a majority of Democrats of the 94th Congress did not keep the word of the United States.

On April the 10th of 1975, President Gerald Ford appealed directly to those members of the congress in an evening Joint Session, televised to the nation. In that speech he literally begged the Congress to keep the word of the United States. But as President Ford delivered his speech, many of the members of the Congress walked out of the chamber. Many of them had an investment in America's failure in Vietnam. They had participated in demonstrations against the war for many years. They wouldn't give the aid.